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I first wrote an example Java server and Android client. I want to keep track of the clients that log on to the server. In the socket objects each Android client will have a unique port number and socket IP address where it is connecting from. So these are the options to identify clients from each other.

I decided not to use the port numbers from each client socket because of the small possibility that the randomly selected port numbers for two Android clients could be the same number. A small chance but possible.

Instead I decided to use the IP socket address that is another string of information included in every client socket. Great idea, right? Not so fast.

The functions to use are:

in the server

   socket.getRemoteSocketAddress()

and in the client

  socket.getLocalSocketAddress()

however when I am using these methods, the returned address is not the same.

if I use getLocaSocketlAddress() on a socket object in the client and send that as a String to the server, then later I have to use getRemoteSocketAddress() on the socket connection in the server and see if it as the same address I received from the client as a string. This is done to identify which client I received the message from. The two address do not match as they are supposed to.

Example, client gets socket address by calling getLocalSocketAddress() on the socket object in client -------> sends address as string in message to server -----> server gets message and calls getRemoteSocketAddress() on socket to select only that client to send message back to. not all the other clients.

The server stores all the sockets of clients that are connected in an ArrayList.

Using getLocalSocketAddress() on the socket for the client side returns for example XXX.XXX.11.17 and if I use getRemoteSocketAddress() in the socket on the server side I get XXX.XXX.0.13, This is messed up, however the port number information matches perfectly if I use getLocalPort() in the client and getPort() in the server.

so it is possible that I can use client port number as a way to reliably identify which client to send a message to.

what is wrong with the getLocalSocketAddress() methods or are they broken? and is there another way to identify between which client has connected to the server?

on the server side, Java swing desktop app

  // desktop connected to the internet by eathernet cable

  socket = serversocket.accept();

    System.out.println("SOCKET ADDRESS: "
    + socket.getRemoteSocketAddress().toString());

on the client side,

   // Android tablet connected to internet by wifi

   public void run() {

       socket = new Socket(InetAddress.getByName(serverIP), 6789);
       socketAddress = (socket.getLocalSocketAddress().toString());

   Log.i(TAG, "SOCKET ADDRESS: " + socketAddress);
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BTW, do you mind sharing more details about the network setup you use to test it? –  Code Painters Feb 28 '13 at 11:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Tracking clients using IP address is a bad idea in general, for several reasons.

First of all, clients can connect through some NAT - in such case the remote address seen by the server is not the same as the address on the client side. Imagine e.g. a setup with ADSL/WiFi router doing NAT - it would (most likely) have one public IP address, WiFi devices would use internal IP addresses, e.g. from 10.0.0.x or 192.168.x.x pool (very popular setup).

Note, that in such a setup several WiFi devices would appear (from the server perspective) to be connecting from the same IP address - the public IP of the router. Obvious implication: the client's IP address is not unique, it's IP/port pair that's unique. To be precise, TCP connections can be uniquely identified by (local IP, local port, remote IP, remote port) tuple.

Last, but not least: client can disconnect and connect again from a different IP address, that's very common in mobile networks (actually in any network where IPs are assigned dynamically).

In your question you wrote:

Example, client gets socket address by calling getLocalSocketAddress() on the socket object in client -------> sends address as string in message to server -----> server gets message and calls getRemoteSocketAddress() on socket to select only that client to send message back to. not all the other clients.

I don't quite get what you mean by select only that client to send message back to. For each connected client you'd have a separate TCP connection, and separate Socket instance. To send data to a particular client, use a socket associated with this particular client, that's it. You shouldn't care about client's IP/port at all, really, that's the task of TCP/IP protocol stack.

If you really want to identify each connecting device, you have to do it above the TCP/IP, in your application protocol. You simply need to send some unique identifier after connecting. But that's whole different story.

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