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good day, I am creating a script to read one level of subfolders/directories of a path. The script is like so:

#loopdir.sh
for i in `ls -d $1`
do
echo $i
done

But when I tried to use it to read /media/My\ Passport/, it reads the argument as two different dirs:

$ ./loopdir.sh /media/My\ Passport/
ls: cannot access /media/My: No such file or directory
Passport/
share|improve this question
    
other ref: linux.byexamples.com/archives/314/… – kepinpin Feb 28 '13 at 10:01
    
Thank you @kepinpin for un-accepting my wrong answer. Now, I can delete it... :-) – anishsane Feb 19 at 14:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try doing this instead (my understanding is that you want to list subdirs, Am I right?) :

for i in "$1"/*; do
    echo "${i%/}"
done

Parsing ls output is a bad idea : it's is a tool for interactively looking at file information. Its output is formatted for humans and will cause bugs in scripts. Use globs or find instead. Understand why: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs

And (last but not least) : USE MORE QUOTES! They are vital. Also, learn the difference between ' and " and `. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/Quotes and http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/words

share|improve this answer
2  
I want to second this consideration of parsing ls. It is widely known for containing black magic that can break what you are doing. – L0j1k Feb 28 '13 at 10:11

You need to surround your $i with quotes: echo "$i"

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, I've just tried it, no dice. The output is still: ls: cannot access /media/My: No such file or directory Passport/ – kepinpin Feb 28 '13 at 9:04
    
Why the backslash in your filename? – L0j1k Feb 28 '13 at 9:07
    
This is going to bother me all night. – L0j1k Feb 28 '13 at 9:15
    
There is no backslash in filename. It has been added by bash, to escape space between My & Passport. – anishsane Feb 28 '13 at 9:17
    
Quoting won't help, as there's nothing that needs to be quoted in $1; the space is used by the shell for wordsplitting before $i's value is set. – chepner Feb 28 '13 at 13:28

don't $i

this will break by space

using "$i"

share|improve this answer
1  
It's too late to quote the variable after you try to iterate over the ouptut of ls. – chepner Feb 28 '13 at 13:27

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