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Following code:

a = function(b) {

    return alfa() + b;

    function alfa() {
        return 7;
    }
}

console.log(a(4));
console.log(a(5));

Does function alfa() is created on each call to a()?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes.

The syntax you use is sugar for this :

a = function(b) {
    var alfa = function() {
            return 7;
    }
    return alfa() + b;
}

console.log(a(4));
console.log(a(5));

It makes it clearer you're creating and assigning alfa each time you execute a.

You could also test it with this simple change :

a = function(b) {
    return alfa; // let's return the function
    function alfa() {
            return 7;
    }
}
console.log(a(4)==a(4)); // logs false

If you want to avoid alfa to be created each time, you may do this :

a = (function(){
  var alfa = function() {
     return 7;
  }
  return function(b) {
     return alfa() + b; 
  }
})();
share|improve this answer
1  
"syntactic sugar" means that you have another syntax for the same effect. Your example doesn't have the same effect, and thus is not syntactic sugar. But it's a nice analogy :P – Florian Margaine Feb 28 '13 at 9:05
1  
@FlorianMargaine Why it doesn't have same effect? – user2091163 Feb 28 '13 at 9:09
1  
@FlorianMargaine is right. In this case, a new variable is declared which gets a function expression assigned as reference. We are no longer talking about a function declaration here. I'm not saying that will change anything at run-time, but still, its a big difference under the hood. – jAndy Feb 28 '13 at 9:14

Yes it will.

Function declarations and variables declared by var are both hoisted up on function invocation. That means, regardless where in a function context, a function declaration is declared, it will technically always be up-front.

a = function(b) {
    return alfa() + b;

    function alfa() {
        return 7;
    }
}

will technically become

a = function(b) {
    function alfa() {
        return 7;
    }

    return alfa() + b;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
The question has nothing to do with hoisting. – T.J. Crowder Feb 28 '13 at 8:58
    
@T.J.Crowder: I'm uncertain. The last question about the initialization of the function, pretty much has. – jAndy Feb 28 '13 at 8:59
    
You mean "Does function alfa() is created on each call to a()?"* How does that relate to hoisting? – T.J. Crowder Feb 28 '13 at 9:00
    
I don't get your point here. The whole question seems to me like the OP is confused about the return statement and a later function declarations. How can that issue not be around hoisting of such ? – jAndy Feb 28 '13 at 9:01
    
Wow, we just totally read "Does function get created on each call to a()" differently. I don't see anything like "Why can I call alfa before I've defined it?" I see "...on each call to a()" and just see zero about the order of things. But no worries. – T.J. Crowder Feb 28 '13 at 9:02

Does function alfa() is created on each call to a()?

A new function object is created every time, yes, and binds to a different execution context (so it has access to the value of b that was passed into a when it was created; alfa is a "closure" over the context of the call to a in which it was created).

A smart JavaScript engine (like V8) may well reuse the underlying code, but a different object is created each time.

share|improve this answer

Yes, it will. Every time you call a, a new instance of alfa will be created.

By the way, in this case, alfa closes over the a context. This is what we call a closure, and allows us to hold state in a function between different calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Not "scope", context. – T.J. Crowder Feb 28 '13 at 9:03
    
Except that alpha() is only run once and then destroyed. – Ja͢ck Feb 28 '13 at 9:04
1  
@T.J.Crowder In computer programming, a scope is the context within a computer program in which a variable name or other identifier is valid and can be used – Florian Margaine Feb 28 '13 at 9:06
    
@FlorianMargaine: Right. And closures aren't about scope, they're about access to the execution context created by the call to a. Scope is about symbol resolution. Put another way: All calls to a have the same scope (set of variable names available to them), but each call to a has its own execution context (specific instances of those variables), which is what makes closures useful. (BTW, if you're going to quote something, shouldn't you cite it? Or if it's original text, why make it look like a quote?) :-) – T.J. Crowder Feb 28 '13 at 9:07
    
@Jack: True, but in theory it's still a closure during the brief time it exists. (In the real world, it probably never exists, since any half-decent engine will inline it, but...) – T.J. Crowder Feb 28 '13 at 9:09

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