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I have a code fragment from a "Runnable" class is like that:

public void run() {
    //Do some stuff
    while(!someCondition){      
        //Do some stuff
        while(anotherCondition){
            try {
                Thread.sleep(60000);
            }catch (InterruptedException e){
                logger.error(e.getMessage());
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            //Do some stuff
        }
        threadExecutor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
        RunnableClass rc = new RunnableClass();
        Thread rcThread = new Thread(rc);
        rcThread.setDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler(new SomeUncaughtExHandler());
        threadExecutor.execute(rcThread);
    }
    //Do some stuff     
}

Does calling Thread.sleep(60000); cause all of RunnableClass Threads to sleep or not?

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Only the current thread. –  dkateros Feb 28 '13 at 9:21
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6 Answers

Thread.sleep() makes the current thread sleep. This is spelled out in the Javadoc:

Causes the currently executing thread to sleep (temporarily cease execution) for the specified number of milliseconds, subject to the precision and accuracy of system timers and schedulers. The thread does not lose ownership of any monitors.

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Thread.sleep() only makes the calling thread sleep.

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Thread.sleep() makes the current thread sleep; but it is bit confusing. This is why, now; the suggested way is to use TimeUnit sleep method. This API got added in Java SE5 version.

  TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(5);

Javadoc :

Performs a Thread.sleep using this unit. This is a convenience method that converts time arguments into the form required by the Thread.sleep method.

Also you can use different units like SECONDS, MILLISECONDS etc to avoid any confusion on the unit of argument passed inside sleep method.

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"This is why, now; the suggested way is to use TimeUnit sleep method." I don't know that it is the suggested way - it is an alternative way. –  assylias Feb 28 '13 at 10:31
    
hmm...i should have used 'more readable' way. thanks for clarification @assylias –  rai.skumar Feb 28 '13 at 11:07
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According to the manual:

Causes the currently executing thread to sleep (temporarily cease execution) for the specified number of milliseconds

So no, it doesn't effect all threads.

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No, only the current thread sleeps. According to the documentation:

Causes the currently executing thread to sleep (temporarily cease execution) for the specified number of milliseconds

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Thread.sleep(x)

causes the current thread to (sleep) suspend execution for a ‘x ‘ ms. This is an efficient means of making processor time available to the other threads of your application or other applications on your system.

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