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This question has been updated. Please review the code.

The following code was compiled with VC++ Nov 2012 CTP. Scott Meyers' book "Effective C++" recommend that we should use the method of to avoid duplication in const and non-const member functions. However, the following code cause a warning (level 1). Because WDK build tool treats warnings as errors, so the following code cannot be compiled successfully.

Is there other better method?

struct A
{
    int n;

    A(int n)
        : n(n)
    {}

    int Get() const
    {
        return n;
    }

    int Get()
    {
        return static_cast<const decltype(*this)&>(*this).Get();
    }
};

int main()
{
    const A a(8);

    //
    // warning C4717: 'A::Get' : recursive on all control paths,
    // function will cause runtime stack overflow
    //
    a.Get(); 
}
share|improve this question
    
Not sure it is related in any way to the warning, but conceptually your const version should be const int& Get() const, i.e. returning reference to const. –  juanchopanza Feb 28 '13 at 9:38
    
@juanchopanza, fixed. –  xmllmx Feb 28 '13 at 9:40
    
In this particular case, the "duplication" would be return n;. How is this an improvement on that? We see that introducing extra code might sometimes also cause extra errors... –  Bo Persson Feb 28 '13 at 10:00
1  
This is a bad example because you actually don't need the non-const Get here. Apart from that, decltype does not behave like you expected. You're not really adding a const this way, so you have an endlessly recursive call. decltype(*this) yields A& in your case and since references are not objects adding const will be ignored. –  sellibitze Feb 28 '13 at 11:39
    
@xmllmx - I don't think Scott Meyers actually recommends avoiding duplication at any cost, he is just offering an alternative for some cases. If avoiding repetition is the goal, and not the means, you can just use return n + 0; and return n - 0; to make the code different. –  Bo Persson Feb 28 '13 at 12:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You've transposed the bodies of the two Get methods, so the compiler is correct; the const Get method is calling itself. Aren't you glad now that your build tool treats warnings as errors? :)

Swap them round:

int& Get()
{
    return const_cast<int&>(static_cast<const A&>(*this).Get());
}

const int& Get() const
{
    return n;
}
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Thus the compiler warning is valid. –  ta.speot.is Feb 28 '13 at 9:45

I believed you got it reverse. This is the non-const version which casts away constness on the const version.

See: Elegant solution to duplicate, const and non-const, getters?

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Answering the updated question. (You should have made this a new question)

In static_cast<const decltype(*this)&>(*this), *this is an lvalue of type A, so the type denoted by decltype(*this) is A& (see 7.1.6.2 [dcl.type.simple]/4).

As a result your non-const Get() function is equivalent to:

int Get()
{
    typedef A & Aref;
    // IMHO a const_cast would be the better choice here
    return static_cast<const Aref&>(*this).Get();
}

cv-qualifiers on a reference type are ignored. With reference-collapsing, your cast is ultimately equvalent to static_cast<A&>(*this), so you don't add the const you need.

So using decl_typedoes not work here. If you very badly want to use it, you'd need:

int Get()
{
    // Made my suggested change of cast here
    return const_cast<const std::remove_reference<decltype(*this)>::type&>(*this).Get();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. I did. See stackoverflow.com/questions/15133644/… –  xmllmx Feb 28 '13 at 11:53

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