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Would it be possible to tell me the best way of moving elements in a List<> up and down.

For example I have a class called Building and Building has a list of Rooms objects List<Room>. The rooms are added to the building by name, but I am using this structure to generate a tree view. The user has the option to move a room up and down within a building.

I was trying to use .Reverse(index, count) but this didn't seem to do anything:

// can this item actually be moved up (is it at the first position in it's current parent?)
if (moveDirection == MoveDirection.UP)
{
    int roomIndex = parentBuilding.Rooms.IndexOf(room);

    if (roomIndex == 0)
    {
        return;
    }
    else
    {
        // move this room up.                            
        parentBuilding.Rooms.Reverse(roomIndex, 1);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The reverse function returns an IEnumerable that is the oposite way of the list the function is used on. So the list itself will not be changed. You can use basic index replacement. Which is if you have two elements in a list and you want to move the second element, you store the first element in a temp variable and designate the second element to the first element, and then assign the second element to the temp variable. –  Stian Standahl Feb 28 '13 at 10:53
    
WinForms or WPF? And how are you generating the TreeView? –  MD.Unicorn Feb 28 '13 at 10:54
    
Using MVC 3 with Razor and i'm building the tree view myself and using jQuery to expand and collapse the UL elements –  Andrew Rayner Feb 28 '13 at 10:55
    
What do you mean by "best" way? The fastest, the most correct, the quickest to implement? –  Kaerber Feb 28 '13 at 11:05

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Create a list extension. Call as List<T>.Move(1, MoveDirection.Up).

 public static class ListExtensions
  {
    public static void Move<T>(this IList<T> list, int iIndexToMove, MoveDirection direction)
    {

      if (direction == MoveDirection.Up)
      {
        var old = list[iIndexToMove - 1];
        list[iIndexToMove -1] = list[iIndexToMove];
        list[iIndexToMove] = old;
      }
      else
      {
        var old = list[iIndexToMove + 1];
        list[iIndexToMove + 1] = list[iIndexToMove];
        list[iIndexToMove] = old;
      }
    }
  }

Things to consider

  • Exception handling - what if you are trying to move the bottom element down or top element up? You will get an index out of range because you can't move these up or down.

  • You could improve this and prevent handling exception by extending functionality to moving the top element to the bottom element and bottom element down to the top element etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I have used this example, I will check what the current Index is before I try and move the element. –  Andrew Rayner Feb 28 '13 at 11:10

Just do a swap:

int roomIndex = parentBuilding.Rooms.IndexOf(room);

if (roomIndex == 0)
{
    return;
}
else
{
    // move this room up.                            
    var temp = parentBuilding.Rooms[index-1];
    parentBuilding.Rooms[index-1] = parentBuilding.Rooms[index];
    parentBuilding.Rooms[index] = temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You appear to have sawped some letters in your text. –  Rawling Feb 28 '13 at 11:02

Personally, I'd make extension method:

static void Swap<TSource>(this IList<TSource> source, int fromIndex, int toIndex)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullExcpetion("source");

    TSource tmp = source[toIndex];
    source[toIndex] = source[fromIndex];
    source[fromIndex] = tmp;
}

Usage:

if (moveDirection == MoveDirection.UP)
{
    int roomIndex = parentBuilding.Rooms.IndexOf(room);

    if (roomIndex == 0)
    {
        return;
    }
    else
    {
        // move this room up.                            
        parentBuilding.Rooms.Swap(roomIndex, roomIndex - 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It's "swap", I think. –  Kaerber Feb 28 '13 at 11:04
    
@Kaerber Yes, thanks. –  Leri Feb 28 '13 at 11:05

How about using SortedDictionary<int, Room> instead of a list. You could store an index in as a Key of the Dictionary and just swap the values when needed.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can't rely on a Dictionary<K,V> to return the contents in the order specified by the key. The dictionary uses a hash table internally. –  Dave Van den Eynde Feb 28 '13 at 10:55
    
Now it will return them in the right order, but you can't change the key without removing/reinserting the values, which is not efficient. –  Dave Van den Eynde Feb 28 '13 at 10:58
    
@DaveVandenEynde I wrote nothing about removing and reinserting. I mentioned swapping the values like this: var temp = dictionary[index]; dictionary[index] = dictionary[index+1] ; dictionary[index + 1] = temp; –  GwynBleidd Feb 28 '13 at 11:06
    
Then why are you using a dictionary? –  Dave Van den Eynde Feb 28 '13 at 14:51
    
@DaveVandenEynde because sorted dictionary is more expressive about the requirement specified in the question. My opinion of course. –  GwynBleidd Feb 28 '13 at 15:24

Swapping places with the room that used to be above should do it:

int roomIndex = parentBuilding.Rooms.IndexOf(room);

if (roomIndex == 0)
{
    return;
}

var wasAbove = parentBuilding.Rooms[roomIndex - 1];
parentBuilding.Rooms[roomIndex - 1] = room;
parentBuilding.Rooms[roomIndex] = wasAbove;

That said, I 'm not sure that this is the best object model for the situation; it's not clear that the order of rooms in the list plays a role, and it's also not clear how a room can be "moved up" -- what does that mean?

It might be better to have a RoomPlacement class that aggregates a room and enough information to locate it, and work with that instead.

share|improve this answer

try this:

int newIndex = whateverIndexYouWantItAt;

int oldIndex = parentBuilding.Rooms.IndexOf(room);
var item = parentBuilding.Rooms[oldIndex];

list.RemoveAt(oldIndex);

if (newIndex > oldIndex) newIndex--; 

parentBuilding.Rooms.Insert(newIndex, item);
share|improve this answer
    
I think inserting and removing from a list is not efficient. I think it's better to swap the values instead, and keep the list at the same size the whole time. –  Dave Van den Eynde Feb 28 '13 at 10:56
    
so if you want it to move one place up you would just make newIndex = oldIndex - 1; I guess –  Toon Casteele Feb 28 '13 at 10:58

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