Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to remove non-ascii char from some file. Can you please help me to find out the proper way to do it.

I have already tried these many regexs.

sed -e 's/[\d00-\d128]//g' (not working)

cat /bin/mkdir| sed -e 's/[\x00-\x7F]//g' >/tmp/aa

but this aa file contains some non-ascii chars.
[root@asssdsada ~]$ hexdump /tmp/aa|more
          00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 - 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F  0123456789ABCDEF

00000000  45 4C 46 B0 F0 73 38 C0 - C0 BC BC FF FF 61 61 61  ELF..s8......aaa
00000010  A0 A0 50 E5 74 64 50 57 - 50 57 50 57 D4 D4 51 E5  ..P.tdPWPWPW..Q.
00000020  74 64 6C 69 62 36 34 6C - 64 6C 69 6E 75 78 78 38  tdlib64ldlinuxx8
00000030  36 36 34 73 6F 32 47 4E - 55 42 C8 C0 80 70 69 42  664so2GNUB...piB
00000040  44 47 BA E3 92 43 45 D5 - EC 46 E4 DE D8 71 58 B9  DG...CE..F...qX.
00000050  8D F1 EA D3 EF 4B 86 FC - A9 DA 79 ED 63 B5 51 92  .....K....y.c.Q.
00000060  BA 6C FC D1 69 78 30 ED - 74 F1 73 95 CC 85 D2 46  .l..ix0.t.s....F
00000070  A5 B4 6C 67 DA 4A E9 9A - 4B 58 77 A4 37 80 C0 4F  ..lg.J..KXw.7..O
00000080  F3 E9 B2 77 65 97 74 F9 - A2 C0 F2 CC 4A 9C 58 A1  ...we.t.....J.X.
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This doesn't seem to work with sed. Perhaps tr will do?

tr -d '\200-\377'

Or with the complement:

tr -cd '\000-\177'
share|improve this answer

Did you try

cat /bin/mkdir | tr -cd "[:print:]"

I think it solves the problem ?

If only text content interest you, you can also use

cat /bin/mkdir | strings
share|improve this answer

Do you know what encoding the file is currently using? If so, you can use iconv to convert it. It's a utility to convert from one character encoding to another. So if the original file is in UTF-8 and you want to convert to ASCII you can use the following:

iconv -f utf8 -t ascii <inputfile>

The file command on the input file might tell you the current encoding.

Interestingly, there's a command called enca which will do its best to determine the character encoding being used if you know the language of the contents of the file.

This other question might be the answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I am working on linux system, which is having very limited pool of commands and 'iconv' is not available. –  user87005 Feb 28 '13 at 11:00
    
Looking at the output from hexdump, is this a binary file? (Guessing from ELF at the start) If so, what's the purpose of removing non-ascii characters? The binary will be corrupted. –  chooban Feb 28 '13 at 11:01
    
it is just an example, friend. –  user87005 Feb 28 '13 at 11:02
    
Ah, cool. I've added a link to a related question which might solve your problems. –  chooban Feb 28 '13 at 11:04
    
same is working fine with this perl command, But I need sed. cat /bin/mkdir | perl -ne 's/[^[:ascii:]]//g;print $_;' –  user87005 Feb 28 '13 at 11:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.