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How can I get the abstract syntax tree of a c program in gcc?
I'm trying to automatically insert OpenMP pragmas to the input c program.
I need to analyze nested for loops for finding dependencies so that I can insert appropriate OpenMP pragmas.
So basically what I want to do is traverse and analyze the abstract syntax tree of the input c program.
How do I achieve this?

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They say Clang is better suited for this task than GCC. I have not tried either though, so no guarantees. –  n.m. Feb 28 '13 at 11:05
    
But I need to use gcc only –  Vishal Vijay Feb 28 '13 at 11:11
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@VishalVijay: This sounds like an artificial constraint. Why must you use only GCC? –  Ira Baxter Feb 28 '13 at 11:36
    
If you're committed to GCC here's another possibility which is out of your reach but which otherwise might be helpful ... rosecompiler.org –  High Performance Mark Feb 28 '13 at 12:54

2 Answers 2

Not exactly an AST but GCCXML might help http://linux.die.net/man/1/gccxml

edit : as stated by Ira Baxter gccxml does not output information about function/methods bodies. Here's a fork that seems to fix that lack http://sourceforge.net/projects/gccxml-bodies/

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gccxml doesn't produce ASTs or in fact anything for the bodies of functions. OP clearly wants ASTs of his loop code. –  Ira Baxter Feb 28 '13 at 11:35
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You are right, thanks for pointing that.I edited the answer to point to a gccxml fork that dumps function bodies too. –  user1654209 Mar 1 '13 at 14:57
    
OK, so how does he get dependences between computations using those ASTs? –  Ira Baxter Mar 1 '13 at 18:10
    
Clearly not an easy task.I guess the product you promote will do the job just fine. –  user1654209 Mar 1 '13 at 18:40
    
DMS has a variety of dependence analyses built-in, yes, and a framework for building others. What OP wants to do isn't easy even with a good dependence analysis foundation. IMHO, its probably hopeless if he starts without one. –  Ira Baxter Mar 1 '13 at 19:09

You need full dataflow to find 'dependencies'. Then you will need to actually insert the OpenMP calls.

What you want is a program transformation system. GCC probably has the dependency information, but it is famously difficult to work with for custom projects. Others have mentioned Clang and Rose. Clang might be a decent choice, but custom analysis/transformation isn't its main purpose. Rose is designed to support custom tools, but IMHO is a rather complicated scheme to use in practice because of its use of the EDG front end, which isn't designed to support transformation.

[THE FOLLOWING TEXT WAS DELETED BY A MODERATOR. I HAVE PUT IT BACK, BECAUSE IT IS ONE THE VALID TRANSFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR THIS TASK. THE FACT THAT I AM RESPONSIBLE FOR IT IN NO WAY DIMINISHES ITS VALUE AS A USEFUL ANSWER TO THE OP.]

Our DMS Software Reengineering Toolkit with its C front end is explicitly designed to be a program transformation system. It has full data flow analysis (including points-to analysis, call graph construction and range analyses) tied to the AST in sensible ways. It provides source-to-source rewrite rules enabling changes to the ASTs expressed in surface syntax form; you can read the transformations rather than inspect a bunch of procedural code. With a modified AST, DMS can regenerate source code including the comments in a compilable form.

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The OP clearly states that he wants to use gcc only... That seems like a poor choice but that is his choice –  user1654209 Mar 1 '13 at 14:40
    
@Ira Baxter thanks for the info. I will discuss about this with my team and get back to you later.. –  Vishal Vijay Mar 1 '13 at 17:18

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