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Given the examples below, how would I make clientList contain 5 clients in the second example?

I want the list.Contains() method only check the FName and LName strings and disregard the age when checking for equality.

struct client
{
    public string FName{get;set;}
    public string LName{get;set;}
    public int age{get;set;}
}

Example 1:

List<client> clientList = new List<client>();

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    client c = new client();
    c.FName = "John";
    c.LName = "Smith";
    c.age = 10;

    if (!clientList.Contains(c))
    {
        clientList.Add(c);
    }
}

//clientList.Count(); = 1

Example 2:

List<client> clientList = new List<client>();

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    client c = new client();
    c.FName = "John";
    c.LName = "Smith";
    c.age = i;

    if (!clientList.Contains(c))
    {
        clientList.Add(c);
    }
}

//clientList.Count(); = 5
share|improve this question
    
You said you want to disregard age, but your 2 examples imply that age is indeed taken into account. Otherwise id expect both examples to result in 1 element in the list –  Jamiec Feb 28 '13 at 11:03
    
@Jamiec Yes it is, but i want it to be not taken into account in the second example. –  zaza Feb 28 '13 at 11:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public class Client : IEquatable<Client>
{
  public string PropertyToCompare;
  public bool Equals(Client other)
  {
    return other.PropertyToCompare == this.PropertyToCompare;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly, i can also implement the interface on a struct so even better :) –  zaza Feb 28 '13 at 11:22

Create a Class which implements IEqualityComparer , and pass the object in list.contains method

share|improve this answer
    
There is no List.Contains method version that could take IEqualityComparer - that method is part of LINQ to Objects and is an extension method declared on IEnumerable<T> –  MarcinJuraszek Feb 28 '13 at 11:04
    
@Saurabh As MarcinJurazek mentioned, IEqualityComparer doesn't work with out LINQ –  zaza Feb 28 '13 at 11:21

Override Equals and GetHashCode in your structure:

struct client
{
    public string FName { get; set; }
    public string LName { get; set; }
    public int age { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null || !(obj is client))
            return false;
        client c = (client)obj;

        return
            (string.Compare(FName, c.FName) == 0) &&
            (string.Compare(LName, c.LName) == 0);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        if (FName == null)
        {
            if (LName == null)
                return 0;
            else
                return LName.GetHashCode();
        }
        else if (LName == null)
            return FName.GetHashCode();
        else
            return FName.GetHashCode() ^ LName.GetHashCode();
    }
}

This implementation handles all the edge cases.

Read this question to know why you should also override GetHashCode().

share|improve this answer

Assuming you are using C# 3.0 or greater, try something like this:

(The following code is not tested, but should be about right)

List<client> clientList = new List<client>();

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    client c = new client();
    c.FName = "John";
    c.FName = "Smith";
    c.age = i;

    var b = (from cl in clientList
             where cl.FName = c.FName &&
                   cl.LName = c.LName
             select cl).ToList().Count() <= 0;

    if (b)
    {
        clientList.Add(c);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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