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I have a date stored in long value i.e. 20130228 and I need to perform operations on it such as adding 30 days or 50 etc. Any suggestions on how to convert it to something more suitable?

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1  
Have you tried anything? What OS are you sing? IDE? –  bash.d Feb 28 '13 at 11:12
    
Are you trying to use 32 bits to store a date? You would have to use bit masking and fixed formatting. Also it would not be time efficient(fast), but it would be space efficient. Anyways, you have to clarify your intent a bit more, we will not invent this format for you. –  Dmitry Feb 28 '13 at 11:12
    
Convert to time_t, ...en.cppreference.com/w/c/chrono –  qPCR4vir Feb 28 '13 at 11:23
    
I am using win7 with visual studio 2010 –  Hansen Feb 28 '13 at 11:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could extract the year, the month and the day and then add your days taking into account how many days are in each month and taking into account leap years.

#include <stdio.h>

unsigned long AddDays(unsigned long StartDay, unsigned long Days)
{
  unsigned long year = StartDay / 10000, month = StartDay / 100 % 100 - 1, day = StartDay % 100 - 1;

  while (Days)
  {
    unsigned daysInMonth[2][12] =
    {
      { 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 }, // 365 days, non-leap
      { 31, 29, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 }  // 366 days, leap
    };

    int leap = !(year % 4) && (year % 100 || !(year % 400));

    unsigned daysLeftInMonth = daysInMonth[leap][month] - day;

    if (Days >= daysLeftInMonth)
    {
      day = 0;
      Days -= daysLeftInMonth;
      if (++month >= 12)
      {
        month = 0;
        year++;
      }
    }
    else
    {
      day += Days;
      Days = 0;
    }
  }

  return year * 10000 + (month + 1) * 100 + day + 1;
}

int main(void)
{
  unsigned long testData[][2] =
  {
    { 20130228, 0 },
    { 20130228, 1 },
    { 20130228, 30 },
    { 20130228, 31 },
    { 20130228, 32 },
    { 20130228, 365 },
    { 20130228, 366 },
    { 20130228, 367 },
    { 20130228, 365*3 },
    { 20130228, 365*3+1 },
    { 20130228, 365*3+2 },
  };

  unsigned i;

  for (i = 0; i < sizeof(testData) / sizeof(testData[0]); i++)
    printf("%lu + %lu = %lu\n", testData[i][0], testData[i][1], AddDays(testData[i][0], testData[i][1]));

  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

20130228 + 0 = 20130228
20130228 + 1 = 20130301
20130228 + 30 = 20130330
20130228 + 31 = 20130331
20130228 + 32 = 20130401
20130228 + 365 = 20140228
20130228 + 366 = 20140301
20130228 + 367 = 20140302
20130228 + 1095 = 20160228
20130228 + 1096 = 20160229
20130228 + 1097 = 20160301

Another option would be to extract the year, the month and the day and convert them into seconds since epoch using mktime() or a similar function, add to that number of seconds the number of seconds representing those days from the given date and then convert the resulting seconds back into the date using gmtime() or localtime() or a similar function and then construct the long integer value. I chose not to use these functions to avoid things like time zones and daylight saving. I wanted a simple and contained solution.

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Downvoter, care to explain what's wrong with this code? –  Alexey Frunze Mar 1 '13 at 1:09
    
It is really a pleasure to read your elegant and working code and have a value per se. Thank for your time. But I think the problem maybe that you don’t mention the standard library to manipulate date. It will be very interesting if you think and explain the libraries are somehow inferior, or you don’t use it just to show an alternative. –  qPCR4vir Mar 1 '13 at 10:10
    
@qPCR4vir I didn't want a chance of involving things like time zones and daylight saving. I wanted a simple and contained solution. That's all. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 1 '13 at 10:18
    
OK, that is a very good reason (and helps to learn to keep it simple). Why not put it in the answer? –  qPCR4vir Mar 1 '13 at 10:28
    
@qPCR4vir I've added that into the answer. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 1 '13 at 22:40

It tends to be much easier to do "math" on dates by converting a date to a "units of time from X" - the time_t in the standard library is "number of seconds from midnight on the 1 Jan 1970". So, using mktime from a struct tm would be one solution.

If for some reason you don't want to do that, then converting your date to a "number of days since (for example) 1 jan 2000" would work. You will have to take into account the leapyears when dealing with whole years (year % 4 == 0 && (year % 100 != 0 || year %400 == 0) should cover that) and of course within a year you have to care for number of days per month. The conversion to date is similar but in reverse.

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If it is stored like this

unsigned long d = 20130228;

you must first split it with simple arithmetic and put it into a struct tm

struct tm tm;
tm.tm_year = d / 10000 - 1900;
tm.tm_mon = (d % 10000) / 100 - 1;
tm.tm_mday = d % 100;
tm.tm_hour = tm.tm_min = tm.tm_sec = 0;
tm.tm_isdst = -1;

and then you can add some value 30 to tm.tm_mday. If you use mktime(), you will receive a time_t as seconds since the epoch and the fields in tm will be normalized

time_t t = mktime(&tm);
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Thanks Olaf for your quick feedback. –  Hansen Feb 28 '13 at 11:56

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