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ActionListeners (with anonymous implementation) are usally added like:

someobject.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae){
        ...
    }
});

But I want to execute my own code before and after every 'actionPerformed' event. So assuming I implement the ActionListener Interface in an own class like:

public class MyOwnActionListener implements ActionListener{
    public void actionPerformed(final ActionEvent ae) {
        // own code
            super.actionPerformed(ae); // I know, this makes no sense, cause ActionListener is an interface
        // own code
    }
}

I want to be able to do something like:

someobject.addActionListener(new MyOwnActionListener(){
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae){
        ...
    }
});

And in my class the code inside the anonymous actionPerformed should be executed instead of super.actionPerformed(ae);. I'm aware, that I can't provide an anonymous implementation to MyOwnActionListener because it's an class rather than an interface and that super.actionPerformed(ae); wouldn't work, cause I want to call the method of the inherited class, not the superclass- but how could I redesign my code to change less as possible of the anonymous implementation of an ActionListener?

Background: I'm trying to implement Busy Cursor Management on a really huge java project (with lots of anonymous ActionListeners). So, if I had to add my own code (change cursor) to every anonymous actionPerformed() I'm going nuts.

Any ideas or suggestions?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try;

public abstract class MyOwnActionListener implements ActionListener{
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(final ActionEvent ae) {
        // own code
        doActionPerformed(ae); 
        // own code
    }

    protected abstract void doActionPerformed(ActionEvent ae);
}

Then implement doActionPerformed in the subclasses.

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Simple and elegant - Thanks! –  Constantin Mar 1 '13 at 12:49

If you are using cursors, put it in a finally. Otherwise you will be stuck on an hourglass if something goes wrong.

@Override
public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    try {
        doBefore(e);
        delegate.actionPerformed(e);
    }finally {
        doAfter(e);
    }

}
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+1 good point :-) –  kleopatra Feb 28 '13 at 16:12

You could implement a wrapper Action/Listener

public WrapperAction extends AbstractAction {

    private Action delegate;

    public WrapperAction(Action delegate) {
       this.delegate = delegate;
    }

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        doBefore(e)
        delegate.actionPerformed(e);
        doAfter(e);
    }

    protected void doBefore(ActionEvent e) {
      ...
    }

    protected void doAfter(ActionEvent e) {
      ...
    }
}

Note: for an action this is incomplete, it must report its values (like enabled, name ...) as the delegate's values and listen to changes of the delegate properties and notify its listeners as needed.

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