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Can anyone let me know how I can calculate the 4rth order cumulants using sliding window in R.

The sample data is like:

-644691181
-121187080
353422690
417492115
-504192375
420646272
-47480551
260350503
2151074145
1251550732
788874753
540183268
396739715
948170766
-1433091907
-148444555
-840182654
-893652578
-1738734435
-1431476210
24974246
93873803
-324033231
479813749
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not quite sure, but I'll make an attempt. There's an all.cumulants function available in package moments. Please read it before using this example.

require(moments)
all.cumulants(all.moments(x, order.max=4))
# [1] 0.000000e+00 0.000000e+00 7.663353e+17 3.842980e+25 8.177093e+34

all.cumulants takes moments of ordner n=0 to k as input. Since you require 4th order cumulants, I suspect you'll have to calculate raw moments upto 4th order and then compute all.cumulants. Does this sound right? If not, please leave a comment and I shall delete my answer.

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Thanks for your response.... Your answer is not the same what I am looking for, but now I have an idea on which I can proceed further based on your explanations :) –  Samraan Feb 28 '13 at 12:03
1  
@Arun congratulations for 10k! great performance –  agstudy Feb 28 '13 at 21:40
    
@agstudy, thanks! just checked. merci beaucoup! :) –  Arun Feb 28 '13 at 22:44
    
@Arun... Have you tried to calculate fourth order cumulants using sliding window, If not then kindly do me favor in that and help me out of this. I have no idea how to do this :( Thanking You in advance –  Samraan Mar 4 '13 at 8:05
    
you'll have to explain what you mean by 4th order cumulants "using sliding window" better, by editing your original post. Also show for the test example show us what you expect. –  Arun Mar 4 '13 at 8:07

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