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I have a project on Arduino Uno, and I am making it from Eclipse. The AVR compiler gives me this:

avrdude: 24348 bytes of flash written avrdude: verifying flash memory against SunAngles.hex: avrdude: load data flash data from input file SunAngles.hex: avrdude: input file SunAngles.hex auto detected as Intel Hex avrdude: input file SunAngles.hex contains 24348 bytes avrdude: reading on-chip flash data:

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 3.45s

avrdude: verifying ... avrdude: 24348 bytes of flash verified

avrdude done. Thank you.

The serial monitor does not print anything. If I make the project to be 23999 bytes then the serial monitor works. I have checked Eclipse's serial monitor and Arduino IDE's Serial monitor. They have the same problem. At the site it says that Arduino Uno has 32 KB flash memory and that 0.5 KB is used for the bootloader. What is happening?

In another question someone says to use serial.print(F(something));, and they give a library for pgm. What should I do to solve this problem?

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1 Answer

Don't forget the small size of RAM, the 328's 2 KB. You may just be running out of RAM. I learned that when it runs out, it just kind of sits there. And to at first it really looked like a flash boundary problem. Just like your symptom.

I suggest reading the readme library to get the FreeRAM from this. It mentions how the "Serial.print" can consume both RAM and ROM.

I always now use

Serial.print(F("HELLO"));

versus

Serial.print("HELLO");

as it saves RAM, and this should be true for lcd.print. Where I always put a

Serial.println(freeMemory(), DEC);  // Print how much RAM is available.

in the beginning of the code, and pay attention. Noting that there needs to be room to run the actual code and recurse into it.

The F() is now stock in Arduino 1.0 and replaces the need for the library function getPSTR().

The latest Arduino IDE also indicates a very rough estimate of expected RAM usage. So there is a switch for that in avr-gcc. You may also want to try using the avr-gcc 4.7.0 rather than 4.3.2 (stock for Arduino), as it claims to be more optimizing.

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The MemoryFree library you link to doesn't take into account memory held in the free list. See updated version on playground.arduino.cc/Code/AvailableMemory –  Matthew Murdoch Feb 28 '13 at 22:13
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