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I am just trying to understand why all fields defined in an Interface are implicitly static and final. The idea of keeping fields static makes sense to me as you can't have objects of an interface but why they are final (implicitly)?

Any one knows why Java designers went with making the fields in an interface static and final?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 58 down vote accepted

An interface can't have behavior or state because it is intended to specify only an interaction contract, no implementation details. No behavior is enforced by not allowing method/constructor bodies or static/instance initializing blocks. No state is enforced by only allowing constants. A constant in Java is defined by a static final field (and by convention the name uses UPPER_CASE_AND_UNDERSCORES).

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+1: I think your reason sounds very logical (better than mine). –  NawaMan Oct 3 '09 at 23:23
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It's not necessarily true that final fields are constants; that's only guaranteed for primitive types. In general, the final keyword merely means that the memory location will not change. –  Pops Oct 29 '09 at 1:13
1  
I didn't say final fields are constants, just that constants are final fields. Note that it is allowed to put a non-primitive static final field in an interface. Even though the contents of that field might change, the reference to it is constant. –  Adriaan Koster Jun 15 '12 at 16:24
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The fields must be static because they can't be abstract (like methods can). Because they can't be abstract, the implementers will not be able to logically provide the different implementation of the fields.

The fields must be final, I think, because the fields may be accessed by many different implementers allows they to be changeable might be problematic (as synchronization). Also to avoid it to be re-implemented (hidden).

Just my thought.

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+1 for the nice explanation –  peakit Oct 3 '09 at 11:41
    
NawMan, your explanation about "The felds must be static..." does not make much sense. But you were very right abt the "The fields must be final..." –  peakit Oct 3 '09 at 12:23
1  
I don't think he is right about the reason why the fields must be final. Allowing different implementers to change a field is not problematic, since otherwise inheritance would be problematic. Fields must be final, as Adriaan said, because an interface is, and should, be stateless. An interface with a state basically should be an abstract class. –  Axelle Ziegler Oct 3 '09 at 15:13
    
If you have a public static field that is not final, findbugs will complain (rightly!). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 3 '09 at 15:50
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There are a couple of points glossed over here:

Just because fields in an interface are implicitly static final does not mean they must be compile-time constants, or even immutable. You can define e.g.

interface I {
  String TOKEN = SomeOtherClass.heavyComputation();
  JButton BAD_IDEA = new JButton("hello");
}

(Beware that doing this inside an annotation definition can confuse javac, relating to the fact that the above actually compiles to a static initializer.)

Also, the reason for this restriction is more stylistic than technical, and a lot of people would like to see it be relaxed.

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REASON FOR BEING FINAL--

Any implementations can change value of fields if they are not defined as final. Then they would become a part of the implementation.An interface is a pure specification without any implementation.

REASON FOR BEING STATIC--

If they are static, then they belong to the interface, and not the object, nor the run-time type of the object.

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I consider the requirement that the fields be final as unduly restrictive and a mistake by the Java language designers. There are times, e.g. tree handling, when you need to set constants in the implementation which are required to perform operations on an object of the interface type. Selecting a code path on the implementing class is a kludge. The workaround which I use is to define an interface function and implement it by returning a literal:

public interface iMine {
    String __ImplementationConstant();
    ...
}

public class AClass implements iMine {
    public String __ImplementationConstant(){
        return "AClass value for the Implementation Constant";
    }
    ...
}

public class BClass implements iMine {
    public String __ImplementationConstant(){
        return "BClass value for the Implementation Constant";
    }
    ...
}

However, it would be simpler, clearer and less prone to aberrant implementation to use this syntax:

public interface iMine {
    String __ImplementationConstant;
    ...
}

public class AClass implements iMine {
    public static String __ImplementationConstant =
        "AClass value for the Implementation Constant";
    ...
}

public class BClass implements iMine {
    public static String __ImplementationConstant =
        "BClass value for the Implementation Constant";
    ...
}
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You seem to be complaining more about the fields being static than being final. –  Daniel Yankowsky Jun 25 at 15:43
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