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When I try to read big file (~412 MB), the file suddenly stops reading. The program worked for a month but now i had en error. I do not know why. Can you help please? When I check it using Purify it said that the program have Memory Allocation Failed at

 s.write(block, f.gcount());

I am writing a big file into buffer (i am reading big pieces of file). Then i parse this buffer and read the next part of the file. I tried to read file with less pieces but the result is the same: the program just stopped reading and then do not do anything. There is no any exception (I tried to catch std::exception) What is the reason? Can you help, please?

The file is very simple:

p edge 45 45

e 4 1 

e 5 6

and so on

Here is the code:

   readFile(char name[]) {
       ifstream f;
       f.open(name,ifstream::binary);
       char buffer[256], token[20];
       int i, j, k, tmp;
       int vi = 0, vj = 0;
       int num_edges = 0;

       if (! f.is_open()) 
       { 
            cout << "Error opening file: " << name << endl; 
            //_getch();
        exit(1); 
       }

       strstream s;
       static const int N = 1024*1024;
       char block[N];


    while (! f.eof() ) 
    {
        s.clear();
        f.read(block, N);
        s.write(block, f.gcount());

        while (! s.eof())
        {
            s.getline(buffer, 250);
            if (s.eof())
            {
                s.write(buffer, s.gcount());
                break;
            }

            if (buffer[0] == 'c')
            {
                continue;
            }

            if (buffer[0] == 'p') 
            {
                cout << buffer << endl;
                sscanf(&buffer[7], "%d", &globalColouredVertices.size);

                if(globalColouredVertices.size > MAX_VERTICES) {
                    cout << "Too many vertices (> " << MAX_VERTICES << ")"<< endl;
                    exit(2);
                }

                //e.resize(globalColouredVertices.size);
                for (i = 0; i < globalColouredVertices.size; i++)
                {
                    globalColouredVertices.ele[i].point = i;
                }
            }
            if (buffer[0] == 'e') 
            {
                num_edges++;
                i = 2;
                j = 0;
                while ((buffer[i] >= '0') && (buffer[i] <= '9')) 
                { 
                    token[j++] = buffer[i];
                    i++; 
                }
                token[j] = '\0';
                vi = atoi(token);
                i++;
                j = 0;
                while ((buffer[i] >= '0') && (buffer[i] <= '9')) 
                { 
                    token[j++] = buffer[i];
                    i++; 
                }
                token[j] = '\0';
                vj = atoi(token);
                vi--;
                vj--;
                e[vi][vj] = 1;
                e[vj][vi] = 1;
            }

            if (num_edges % 10000 == 0)
                cout << num_edges << endl;
            else if (num_edges %  24380000 == 0) {
                cout << endl;
            }
        }
    }
 }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your use of a strstream as a buffer is broken and almost certainly unnecessary.

This code will put a partial line in your strstream. so when you come to read it line-by-line later you'll probably get an incomplete line at the end of each buffer, then another incomplete line at the start of the next.

    f.read(block, N);
    s.write(block, f.gcount());

That, in conjunction with the lack of any array bound checking in your code (particularly this snippet, and the ones mentioned by others) means this is a car-crash waiting to happen.

            e[vi][vj] = 1;
            e[vj][vi] = 1;

I strongly recommend you

  • a: remove the strstream buffer entirely.
  • b: Consider using std::vector instead of manually allocating buffers.
  • c: You can then use the at() function for bounds-checked access, which will throw exceptions.

Don't worry about optimizations or performance until that's done.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i will add checking of bounds in the array. But I use it because i need good performance. As experimental results show that vector works worse than array. –  user565447 Feb 28 '13 at 16:05
    
@user565447 "premature optimization is the root of all evil" Donald Knuth, 1974 –  Roddy Mar 1 '13 at 10:45
    
yes, i agree. But i need it. It is not a commercial project. It is necessary to do it for science. –  user565447 Mar 1 '13 at 11:50

It may not be the problem you're seeing, but there are a couple of potential buffer overruns in your code. For example:

while ((buffer[i] >= '0') && (buffer[i] <= '9')) 
{ 
    token[j++] = buffer[i];
    i++; 
}

You should really be checking that the index doesn't exceed the buffer size.

share|improve this answer
    
i am sure that the file is correct and will be correct –  user565447 Feb 28 '13 at 13:02

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