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I don't understand why this program is not working.

I need to find the number of occurrences of all characters in three strings by any method.

I used count method but if you guys can help me out with find function so it would be better.

#include<iostream>
#include<algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string line[3];
    int count[3];
    cout << "Enter three lines of text...\n\n";
    cin >> line[0];
    cin >> line[1];
    cin >> line[2];
    int i;
    for(char j='a'; j<=26; j++) {
        for(i=0; i<3; i++)
            count[i] = std::count(line[i].begin(), line[i].end(), j);
        cout << "\n" << j << "\t" << ":" << "\t" << count[i];
    }

    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}
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1  
If you formatted your code properly then at least one of several bugs would become immediately apparent. –  Paul R Feb 28 '13 at 13:17
    
@user1885560 i didn't understand can you show a output format that you want? –  Parvathy Feb 28 '13 at 13:18
    
i need output in a way that each character's number of occurences should come separately... –  Daniel Radcliffe Feb 28 '13 at 13:35
    
like this... a: number b: number... and so on... –  Daniel Radcliffe Feb 28 '13 at 13:35

5 Answers 5

26 is no letter, and (char)26 is normally less than 'a' - so your loop will not execute. Try char j='a';j<='z';j++

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I would go for something like this:

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    // Given 3 strings...
    std::string s1 = "Hello";
    std::string s2 = "Cruel";
    std::string s3 = "World";

    //===============================================
    // THESE 2 LINES ARE ALL YOU NEED FOR COUNTING
    std::map<char, int> countMap;
    for (char c : (s1 + s2 + s3)) { countMap[c]++; }
    //===============================================

    // Print the output. This is if you do not care about
    // characters that do not appear at all.
    for (auto const& e : countMap)
    {
        std::cout << e.first << ": " << e.second << std::endl;
    }

    // Print the output. This is if you DO care about
    // characters that do not appear at all.
    for (char c = ' '; c <= '~'; c++)
    {
        std::cout << c << ": " << countMap[c] << std::endl;
    }
}
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http://www.asciitable.com/

Lower case 'a' is 96. Which is less than 26 which is why your loop doesn't execute. Try:

for (char j = 'a'; j <= 'z'; j++)

This will only count the lower case characters. If you wanted the occurrence of lower and upper case you could do this:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string line[3];

    cout << "Enter three lines of text...\n\n";
    cin >> line[0];
    cin >> line[1];
    cin >> line[2];

    for(char j='a';j<='z';j++)
    {
        int upper_sum = 0;
        int lower_sum = 0;

        for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
        {
            lower_sum += std::count(line[i].begin(),line[i].end(),j);
            upper_sum += std::count(line[i].begin(),line[i].end(),j - 32); //32 = 'a' - 'A'
        }

        cout<<"\n"<<j<<"\t"<<":"<<"\t"<<lower_sum;
        cout<<"\n"<<(char)(j - 32)<<"\t"<<":"<<"\t"<<upper_sum;
    }
    return 0;
}
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Thanks let me try this.. –  Daniel Radcliffe Feb 28 '13 at 13:36
    
but in this way i wont get all the counts of three lines...it will give the output of only the third line... because at the cout statement the value of i is 3... i need count[0]+count[1]+count[2]... how will i get this..? –  Daniel Radcliffe Feb 28 '13 at 13:38
    
Edited for the i = 3 thing. Ok so you want the combined count of a letter from all the strings? –  ThePosey Feb 28 '13 at 13:44
    
yes yes... exactly... now u got what i am trying to calculate... number of each letter in all three strings.. combinely.. –  Daniel Radcliffe Feb 28 '13 at 13:49
    
alright edited for that. should give you want you need –  ThePosey Feb 28 '13 at 13:55

Here's a correct version of your program:

#include<iostream>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
string line[3];
int count[3];
/*cout<<"Enter three lines of text...\n\n";
cin>>line[0];
cin>>line[1];
cin>>line[2];*/

      line[0] = "aaaaabbbbbbbbbbb";
      line[1] = "ccccccddddddddddd";
      line[2] = "kkkkkkkkkkkkk";

     int i;
     for(char j='a';j<= 'z';j++) // You can loop through the alphabet, but you need to go 'a' to 'z' and not 26
     { 

             for(i=0;i<3;i++) 
             { // You were missing these braces,  you need them if your loop contains multiple lines
               count[i]= std::count(line[i].begin(),line[i].end(),j);
               cout<<"\n"<<j<<"\t"<<":"<<"\t"<<count[i];
             }
    }

    system ("pause");
    return 0;

}

And here it is in action.

share|improve this answer
    
@PaulR Oops Fixed. –  Tony The Lion Feb 28 '13 at 14:04
    
i dont need the braces for the loop... why everyone is putting braces when i dont want the cout line to be included in the loop... –  Daniel Radcliffe Mar 1 '13 at 7:24
int i;
for(char j='a'; j<=26; j++) {
    for(i=0; i<3; i++)
        count[i] = std::count(line[i].begin(), line[i].end(), j);
    cout << "\n" << j << "\t" << ":" << "\t" << count[i];
}

Your cout line isn't in the inner for loop.

After the inner loop finishes, i is 3. Then cout is called with count[i] which goes out of bounds on the array. Undefined behaviour, you're lucky if it crashes.

Your problem is the i. The place it's declared means it still exists and the cout line can reference it. If you move the declaration to the loop initialiser you'll find the next error:

for(int i=0; i<3; i++)
    count[i] = std::count(line[i].begin(), line[i].end(), j);
cout << "\n" << j << "\t" << ":" << "\t" << count[i];

The last line won't compile as i goes out of scope at the end of the loop. I assume you were mistaken in thinking cout was part of the loop, partly due to the poor formatting of the code, and secondly because i was declared at a wider scope.

To correct this, create a block for the for loop by using { and }. This will keep the i in scope for all statements within the block, and repeat the statements for each iteration of the loop.

for(int i=0; i<3; i++) {
    count[i] = std::count(line[i].begin(), line[i].end(), j);
    cout << "\n" << j << "\t" << ":" << "\t" << count[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
the cout line below the for loop is outside the loop... i never wanted to make it a part of the loop.. its not poor programming at least i know it... i did not put brackets because i wanted it to remain outside the loop... well i am done with the program i got it done with re initialising count[] to zero... –  Daniel Radcliffe Mar 1 '13 at 7:23
    
The cout doesn't make sense there though because it's outputting count[3], which is undefined. The valid values are count[0], count[1], and count[2]. –  Peter Wood Mar 1 '13 at 9:23
    
yeAh... exactly.. so now i corrected it... its working fine now... –  Daniel Radcliffe Mar 1 '13 at 14:27

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