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I would like to handle a collection in parallel, but I'm having trouble implementing it and I'm therefore hoping for some help.

The trouble arises if I want to call a method marked async in C#, within the lambda of the parallel loop. For example:

var bag = new ConcurrentBag<object>();
Parallel.ForEach(myCollection, async item =>
{
  // some pre stuff
  var response = await GetData(item);
  bag.Add(response);
  // some post stuff
}
var count = bag.Count;

The problem occurs with the count being 0, because all the threads created are effectively just background threads and the Parallel.ForEach call doesn't wait for completion. If I remove the async keyword, the method looks like this:

var bag = new ConcurrentBag<object>();
Parallel.ForEach(myCollection, item =>
{
  // some pre stuff
  var responseTask = await GetData(item);
  responseTask.Wait();
  var response = responseTask.Result;
  bag.Add(response);
  // some post stuff
}
var count = bag.Count;

It works, but it completely disables the await cleverness and I have to do some manual exception handling.. (Removed for brevity).

How can I implement a Parallel.ForEach loop, that uses the await keyword within the lambda? Is it possible?

The prototype of the Parallel.ForEach method takes an Action<T> as parameter, but I want it to wait for my asynchronous lambda.

Please help?

share|improve this question
up vote 25 down vote accepted

If you just want simple parallelism, you can do this:

var bag = new ConcurrentBag<object>();
var tasks = myCollection.Select(async item =>
{
  // some pre stuff
  var response = await GetData(item);
  bag.Add(response);
  // some post stuff
});
await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
var count = bag.Count;

If you need something more complex, check out Stephen Toub's ForEachAsync post.

share|improve this answer
5  
Probably a throttling mechanism is needed. This will immediately create as many tasks as there are items which might end up in 10k network requests and such. – usr Feb 28 '13 at 13:32
    
@usr The last example in Stephen Toub's article addresses that. – svick Feb 28 '13 at 23:09

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