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I'm having some problems with serial ports in a cross-platform application (with Linux embedded and actual embedded targets), which also works on Windows to make development easier. This is about the Windows implementation.

The implementation of the serial protocol is, therefore, targetted at a mixture of OS- and non-OS systems and I won't touch the implementation itself. I'd like to make it compatible with the existing implementation. If that fails within reasonable time, I'll just make a separate thread for serial reading.

OK, basically the implementation opens the serial port, registers the file descriptor in our IO system (which uses epoll on Linux and WaitForMultipleObjects on Windows) and then, basically, just waits for all handles and does whatever required. So we want to read from the serial port when the handle is signaled for reading. Unfortunately on Windows, you can't specify if you're waiting for read or write, so I thought I'd use the following solution:

  • CreateFile with FILE_FLAG_OVERLAPPED
  • SetCommMask with EV_RXCHAR
  • Create an OVERLAPPED structure with a manual reset event
  • Call WaitCommEvent with said OVERLAPPED structure, which usually returns ERROR_IO_PENDING

That's the basic setup. I register the event handle instead of the file handle to wait on. When the handle is signalled, I do the following:

  • ReadFile
  • If successful, ResetEvent and call WaitCommEvent again

It seems, however, that if you specify FILE_FLAG_OVERLAPPED, you must use overlapped IO also for reading and writing. So I thought that whenever ReadFile or WriteFile return ERROR_IO_PENDING, I'll just wait for the IO with WaitForSingleObject and GetOverlappedResult. It seems that I don't get into that though. It seems to work basically, but sometimes it crashes on one of the ResetEvent calls, as if the overlapped was still active (though I guess it still shouldn't crash).

So, the actual question. Can this be done as I want it? Is there a problem with the approach in general, or should it work? Or is using yet another thread the only good solution? The communication is already in a separate thread, so it would be at least three threads then.


I'll try to post as much code as needed, though it is reduced from the actual code which contains a lot of things not directly related to serial reading.

SerialPort::SerialPort(const std::string &filename)
{
    fd = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    m_ov = new OVERLAPPED(); // Pointer because header shouldn't include Windows.h.
    memset(m_ov, 0, sizeof(OVERLAPPED));
    m_waitHandle = m_ov->hEvent = CreateEvent(0, true, 0, 0);
}

SerialPort::~SerialPort(void)
{
    Close();
    CloseHandle(m_ov->hEvent);
    delete m_ov;
}

The constructor is called in a separate thread, which later calls Open:

bool SerialPort::Open(void)
{
    if (fd != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        return true;
    fd = CreateFile(filename.c_str(), GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, 0, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_FLAG_OVERLAPPED, NULL);
    if (fd != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) {
        DCB dcb;
        ZeroMemory(&dcb, sizeof(DCB));

        COMMTIMEOUTS timeouts = {0};
        timeouts.ReadIntervalTimeout = TimeOut();
        timeouts.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant = TimeOut();
        timeouts.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier = TimeOut() / 5;
        if (timeouts.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier == 0) {
            timeouts.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier = 1;
        }

        if (!SetCommTimeouts(fd, &timeouts)) {
            DebugBreak();
        }
        SetCommMask(fd, EV_RXCHAR);
        InitWait();

        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

void SerialPort::InitWait()
{
    if (WaitForSingleObject(m_ov->hEvent, 0) == WAIT_OBJECT_0) {
        return; // Still signaled
    }         
    DWORD dwEventMask;
    if (!WaitCommEvent(fd, &dwEventMask, m_ov)) {
        // For testing, I have some prints here for the different cases.
    }
}

Via a rather long chain, the thread then calls WaitForMultipleObjects on m_waitHandle, which is the same as the hEvent member of the OVERLAPPED structure. This is done in a loop, and there are several other handles in the list, that's why this is different from the typical solution where you have a thread exclusively reading from the serial port. I have, basically, no control about the loop, that's why I try to do the WaitCommEvent (within InitWait) at just the right time.

When the handle is signaled, the ReadData method is called by the thread:

int SerialPort::ReadData(void *buffer, int size)
{
    if (fd != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) {
        // Timeouts are reset here to MAXDWORD/0/0, not sure if necessary.
        DWORD dwBytesRead;
        OVERLAPPED ovRead = {0};
        ovRead.hEvent = CreateEvent(0, true, 0, 0);
        if (ReadFile(fd, buffer, size, &dwBytesRead, &ovRead)) {
            if (WaitForSingleObject(m_ov->hEvent, 0) == WAIT_OBJECT_0) {
                // Only reset if signaled, because we might get here because of a timer.
                ResetEvent(m_waitHandle);
                InitWait();
            }
            CloseHandle(ovRead.hEvent);
            return dwBytesRead;
        } else {
            if (GetLastError() == ERROR_IO_PENDING) {
                WaitForSingleObject(ovRead.hEvent, INFINITE);
                GetOverlappedResult(fd, &ovRead, &dwBytesRead, true);
                InitWait();
                CloseHandle(ovRead.hEvent);
                return dwBytesRead;
            }
        }
        InitWait();
        CloseHandle(ovRead.hEvent);
        return -1;
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
}

The write is done as follows, without syncing:

int SerialPort::WriteData(const void *buffer, int size)
{
    if (fd != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) {
        DWORD dwBytesWritten;
        OVERLAPPED ovWrite = {0};
        ovWrite.hEvent = CreateEvent(0, true, 0, 0);
        if (!WriteFile(fd, buffer, size, &dwBytesWritten, &ovWrite)) {
            if (GetLastError() == ERROR_IO_PENDING) {
                WaitForSingleObject(ovWrite.hEvent, INFINITE);
                GetOverlappedResult(fd, &ovWrite, &dwBytesWritten, true);
                CloseHandle(ovWrite.hEvent);
                return dwBytesWritten;
            } else {
                CloseHandle(ovWrite.hEvent);
                return -1;
            }
        }
        CloseHandle(ovWrite.hEvent);
    }
    return 0;
}

It seems that it does work now. There are no crashes anymore, at least I can't reproduce them. So as it works now, I'm just asking if what I do is sane, or if I should do things differently.

share|improve this question
1  
Yes, this can be done and this is very commonly done. Lots of words but no hint whatsoever what you might have done wrong. –  Hans Passant Feb 28 '13 at 13:31
    
@HansPassant: If I knew what I might have done wrong, I wouldn't ask this question, would I? I can post hundred lines of code if that makes you feel better. I did, however, not find a single source where someone does it the way I need it. –  OregonGhost Feb 28 '13 at 13:35
    
What's the nature of the crash? –  Carey Gregory Feb 28 '13 at 18:31
    
You have to use ReadFileEx for overlapped I/O. –  Jonathan Potter Feb 28 '13 at 19:25
    
@JonathanPotter: that is not true. ReadFile() supports overlapped I/O as well. The only difference between ReadFile() and ReadFileEx() is that ReadFile() supports both synchronous and asynchronous I/O whereas ReadFileEx() only supports asynchronous I/O. –  Remy Lebeau Feb 28 '13 at 19:45

1 Answer 1

Offhand, I don't see any errors in the code you have shown, but I would like to suggest alternative code to clean up your error handling in ReadData() and WriteData() in general:

int SerialPort::ReadData(void *buffer, int size)
{
    if (fd == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        return 0;

    OVERLAPPED ovRead = {0};
    ovRead.hEvent = CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);
    if (!ovRead.hEvent)
        return -1;

    DWORD dwBytesRead;
    if (!ReadFile(fd, buffer, size, &dwBytesRead, &ovRead))
    {
        if (GetLastError() != ERROR_IO_PENDING)
        {
            CloseHandle(ovRead.hEvent);
            return -1;
        }

        if (!GetOverlappedResult(fd, &ovRead, &dwBytesRead, TRUE))
        {
            CloseHandle(ovRead.hEvent);
            return -1;
        }
    }

    if (WaitForSingleObject(m_waitHandle, 0) == WAIT_OBJECT_0)
    {
        ResetEvent(m_waitHandle);
        InitWait();
    }

    CloseHandle(ovRead.hEvent);
    return dwBytesRead;
}

int SerialPort::WriteData(const void *buffer, int size)
{
    if (fd == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        return 0;

    OVERLAPPED ovWrite = {0};
    ovWrite.hEvent = CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);
    if (!ovWrite.hEvent)
        return -1;

    DWORD dwBytesWritten;
    if (!WriteFile(fd, buffer, size, &dwBytesWritten, &ovWrite))
    {
        if (GetLastError() != ERROR_IO_PENDING)
        {
            CloseHandle(ovWrite.hEvent);
            return -1;
        }

        if (!GetOverlappedResult(fd, &ovWrite, &dwBytesWritten, TRUE))
        {
            CloseHandle(ovWrite.hEvent);
            return -1;
        }
    }

    CloseHandle(ovWrite.hEvent);
    return dwBytesWritten;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, the code I wrote was created more or less in a rush, since I was just trying to get things running ;) –  OregonGhost Mar 4 '13 at 9:37
    
Unfortunately, we're still getting 0xC0000005 crashes on some machines, and mostly in the call to SerialPort::ReadData, sometimes in the ResetEvent call. In all cases I've seen, we were coming from WaitForMultipleObjectsEx from outside, so the event was signalled. ReadData is potentially also called by a timer which just checks if there is something there (to avoid telegrams staying in internal buffers until more IO comes). The timer can never trigger at the same time as IO. Can something be potentially inaccessible when leaving Read/WriteData? I expected that the code is synchronous. –  OregonGhost Mar 4 '13 at 12:19
    
It's rather strange now. I tried disabling the timer, using local buffers instead of the given ones, and we're still crashing. With the code like above, we now mostly crash in WriteData in the GetOverlappedResult call. dwBytesWritten already contains a value at the crash point (like 10 or 17), so it seems GetOverlappedResult is ready to return. If we change a few things within the function, the debugger stops outside the WriteData call, but has a deep stack to ntdll and KernelBase. It's as if there's something wrong with the stack. There must be a problem with this code as it is ;) –  OregonGhost Mar 4 '13 at 12:57
    
It seems I got it. I re-read all the documentation and came to an interesting thing: WaitCommEvent writes to the dwEventMask I supply. And it does so once the wait completes. But since I made the call in a function, it is gone later - leading to stack corruption. All the examples don't have a problem because they have a dedicated loop with a local variable for that... Will test on the machines where it happened all the time. –  OregonGhost Mar 6 '13 at 10:30

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