Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using the following code:

from numpy import *
from matplotlib.pyplot import *

Radius=10
N=1024
dx=2*Radius/N
dy=dx
x=r_[-Radius:Radius:dx]
y=r_[-Radius:Radius:dy]
X, Y = meshgrid(x,y)
R = sqrt(X**2+Y**2)
PHI = arctan2(Y,X)

ringthing = R < Radius
ring = zeros((2,N,N),dtype=complex)
ring[0] = ringthing
ring[1] = ringthing*exp(1j*PHI)

f=fig()
p1=f.add_subplot(121)
p1.imshow(angle(ring[0]))
p2=f.add_subplot(122)
p2.imshow(angle(ring[1]))

f.show()

The lower left square of the second image is colored red (phase equals pi) for no obvious reason. Why is this?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is that the value outside of the circle is zero and the complex angle of zero is not well defined (its a singularity). The float point arithmetics work out such that in some parts they evaluate to 0 and in others to -0 which is seen by running

from __future__ import division

from numpy import *

Radius=10
N=1024
dx=2*Radius/N
dy=dx
x=r_[-Radius:Radius:dx]
y=r_[-Radius:Radius:dy]
X, Y = meshgrid(x,y)
R = sqrt(X**2+Y**2)
PHI = arctan2(Y,X)

ringthing = R < Radius
ring = zeros((2,N,N),dtype=complex)
ring[0] = ringthing
ring[1] = ringthing*exp(1j*PHI)

print ring[1][-1, 0], angle(ring[1][-1, 0])
print ring[1][0, -1], angle(ring[1][0, -1])

with the output

(-0+0j) 3.14159265359
0j 0.0

One solution around this would be to set all values outside the circle to zero explicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
Neat! I was trying to get here, using unwrap() but yes seems like the zero() +/- issue. –  Arcturus Feb 28 '13 at 14:05
    
I would argue that it might be useful to have angle() return nan when given a zero input, but that's basically a definition. –  David Zwicker Feb 28 '13 at 14:07
    
Thanks for the detailed explanation. I'm considering submitting a bug report for this though. For one, Matlab handles this gracefully, and the pi phase shift is arbitrary as per this example (with some underlying implementation reason as explained in your answer). –  rubenvb Feb 28 '13 at 14:12
    
Well the problem is that you ask for the angle of a vanishing complex number, which is not defined. I think the proper implementation should return nan or throw an exception, but someone chose to return either 0 or pi depending on the sign. It's an implementation detail, but I would rather change your code, because I don't believe the definition of angle is going to be changed. –  David Zwicker Feb 28 '13 at 14:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.