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Why is

for (
  a <- 1 to 1000;
  b <- 1 to 1000 - a;
  c <- 1 to 1000 - a - b;
  if (a * a + b * b == c * c && a + b + c == 1000)
) println((a, b, c, a * b * c))

266 ms

slower then:

for (a <- 1 to 1000)
  for (b <- 1 to 1000 - a)
    for (c <- 1 to 1000 - a - b)
      if (a * a + b * b == c * c)
        if (a + b + c == 1000)
          println((a, b, c, a * b * c))

62 ms

If I understand correct this should be the same?


Solution after processing answers:

for (
  a <- 1 to 1000;
  b <- 1 to (1000 - a)
) {
  val c = (1000 - a - b)
  if (a * a + b * b == c * c)
    println((a, b, c, a * b * c))
}

9 ms

share|improve this question
    
It really useful to write at least Scala version you used. At most your OS and other related info. – om-nom-nom Feb 28 '13 at 14:00
    
I'm using a windows 7 and version version 2.9.2 using eclipse with jre7. – Jeff Feb 28 '13 at 14:12
3  
Weird way to search for solutions--you require a+b+c==1000 so why not just set c = 1000 - a - b? (Obviously this isn't an answer to the question....) – Rex Kerr Feb 28 '13 at 14:35
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Your understanding is wrong.

for(x <- coll) if(condition) dosomething

will translate to

coll.foreach{x => if(condition) dosomething }

for(x <- coll if(condition))  dosomething

which will translate to

coll.withFilter(x => condition).foreach{ x => dosomething }

You can look into The Scala Language Specification 6.16 for more details.

share|improve this answer

You may want to check this presentation (slides 13-15) for details on how for loops are translated internally.

The main difference of your examples are:

  • condition in for loop body (2. example)
  • condition within the generator (1. example)

The latter, also referred to as for loop filtering comes with a performance drawback by design. To extremely simplify what is happening: Within withFilter (which is the first step of the translation) an anonymous new function of type Function2[Object, Boolean] is created (which is used to evaluate the condition). The parameter that is passed to its apply function must be boxed, since it is defined based on Object. This boxing/unboxing is much slower than evaluating the if condition directly within the for loop body, which allows to access variables directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Those slides are very interesting even found a better solution :) – Jeff Feb 28 '13 at 14:21
    
@Downvoter: Would you mind to explain what is wrong with my answer? – bluenote10 May 11 '14 at 19:35

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