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I started playing around with OpenGL and GLUT. I would like to draw some points, but the problem is that they turn out to be squares, and I would like them to be round dots (filled circles).

This is what I do:

void onInitialization( ) 
{ 
    glEnable( GL_POINT_SMOOTH );
    glEnable( GL_BLEND );
    glBlendFunc( GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA );
    glPointSize( 6.0 );
}    

void onDisplay()
{
    glClearColor( 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f );
    glClear( GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT );

    glBegin( GL_POINTS );
        glColor3f( 0.95f, 0.207, 0.031f );
    for ( int i = 0; i < g_numPoints; ++i )
    {
        glVertex2f( g_points[i].X, g_points[i].Y );
    }
    glEnd();
    glFinish();
    glutSwapBuffers();
}

This is the result: Result of the above code

The points show up where expected, only their shape is wrong.

share|improve this question
1  
You didn't mention what your target platform is. Some OpenGL features (like GL_POINT_SMOOTH) are not widely supported. If you intend for your application to run widely on consumer-grade video cards, make sure to test before you commit yourself to exotic extensions. Even if it appears to work, check the performance. It may drop you to software mode. –  Alan Oct 5 '09 at 18:58
    
No, but I did mention that I just started playing with opengl, much like a hobby ;) –  Tamás Szelei Oct 7 '09 at 13:47
    
If you just want your code to run on your own computer then by all means, do whatever works on your computer. But it's also valuable to understand that a major pitfall of OpenGL is that large parts of the spec will not function correctly on any given platform. Exactly which parts these are is a very poorly documented secret. Software-mode fallbacks will tend to obscure unsupported features. –  Alan Oct 8 '09 at 21:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Unlike what was said previously, this is possible with the fixed-function pipeline, even with the GL_POINTS primitive type, as long as you have support for OpenGL 1.4 or the GL_ARB_point_sprite extension. Consult this document, or the OpenGL core specification of your choice : http://www.opengl.org/registry/specs/ARB/point_sprite.txt

GL_ARB_point_sprite converts points into "quads", i.e a polygon with the form of a plane. The exact primitive type it gets converted to is not defined by the specification, though it is not important. What is important is that GL_COORD_REPLACE auto-generates texture coordinates for the surface when enabled, so you can texture-map them with a sphere-shaped RGBA-texture.

EDIT: It seems like you (the poster) is right. Anti-aliased points get rounded with respect to their radius. (I've used OpenGL since 2003, and I didn't know this. [/shame]) So enabling GL_POINT_SMOOTH while you have a multisample-able visual/pixelformat, you get rounded points. Still, multisampling can be slow, so I'd implement both. Textured quads are cheap.

To request a visual with multisampling with XLib, use these two attributes in the list to glXChooseFBConfig():

GLX_SAMPLE_BUFFERS - its value should be True. This is an on/off toggle.
GLX_SAMPLES - the number of samples.

To request a pixelformat with Win32, use these two attributes in the list to ChoosePixelFormat() or wglChoosePixelFormatARB():

WGL_SAMPLE_BUFFERS_ARB Same as above, a toggle.
WGL_SAMPLES_ARB Same as above, the number of samples.

It seem that you can OR in the flag GLUT_MULTISAMPLE to glutInitDisplayMode to get multisampling in GLUT, but you can't request the number of sample buffers.

Here is how alpha-blended quads could be implemented using your test case.

void onInitialization( ) 
{
    glEnable( GL_POINT_SPRITE ); // GL_POINT_SPRITE_ARB if you're
                                 // using the functionality as an extension.

    glEnable( GL_POINT_SMOOTH );
    glEnable( GL_BLEND );
    glBlendFunc( GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA );
    glPointSize( 6.0 );

    /* assuming you have setup a 32-bit RGBA texture with a legal name */
    glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
    glEnable( GL_TEXTURE_2D );
    glTexEnv(GL_POINT_SPRITE, GL_COORD_REPLACE, GL_TRUE);
    glTexEnv(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_TEXTURE_ENV_MODE, GL_REPLACE);
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, texture_name);
}    

void onDisplay()
{
    glClearColor( 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f );
    glClear( GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT );

    glBegin( GL_POINTS );
        glColor4f( 0.95f, 0.207, 0.031f, 1.0f );
    for ( int i = 0; i < g_numPoints; ++i )
    {
        glVertex2f( g_points[i].X, g_points[i].Y );
    }
    glEnd();
    glFinish();
    glutSwapBuffers();
}

Image of rounded points using per-fragment alpha blending + textures:
Image of rounded points by using GL_POINT_SMOOTH and multisampling:
A little sample I made which shows both techniques. Requires libSDL and libGLEW to compile:

#include <iostream>
#include <exception>
#include <memory>
#include <SDL/SDL.h> 
#include <cmath>
#include <GL/glew.h>
#include <GL/glu.h>

#define ENABLE_TEXTURE
#define ENABLE_MULTISAMPLE

int Width = 800;
int Height = 600;

void Draw(void);
void Init(void);

inline float maxf(float a, float b)
{
    if(a < b)
        return b;
    return a;
}

inline float minf(float a, float b)
{
    if(a > b)
        return b;
    return a;
}

GLuint texture_name;

int main(void)
{
    try {
        SDL_Init(SDL_INIT_VIDEO);
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_RED_SIZE, 8);
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_GREEN_SIZE, 8);
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_BLUE_SIZE, 8);
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_ALPHA_SIZE, 8);
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_STENCIL_SIZE, 8);
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_DEPTH_SIZE, 24);
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_DOUBLEBUFFER, 1);
        #ifdef ENABLE_MULTISAMPLE
            SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_MULTISAMPLEBUFFERS, 1);
            SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_MULTISAMPLESAMPLES, 4);
        #endif
        SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_SWAP_CONTROL, 1);
        SDL_SetVideoMode(Width, Height, 32, SDL_OPENGL);

        glewInit();
        Init();

        SDL_Event event;
        bool running = true;

        while(running){
            while(SDL_PollEvent(&event)){
                switch(event.type)
                {
                    case SDL_KEYDOWN:
                        if(event.key.keysym.sym == SDLK_ESCAPE)
                            running = false;
                    break;
                    case SDL_QUIT:
                        running = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            Draw();
            SDL_GL_SwapBuffers();
        }
        SDL_Quit();
    }
    catch(std::bad_alloc& e)
    {
        std::cout << "Out of memory. " << e.what() << std::endl;
        exit(-1);
    }
    catch(std::exception& e)
    {
        std::cout << "Runtime exception: " << e.what() << std::endl;
        exit(-1);
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        std::cout << "Runtime exception of unknown type." << std::endl;
        exit(-1);
    }
    return 0;
}

void Init(void)
{
    const GLint texWidth = 256;
    const GLint texHeight = 256;
    const float texHalfWidth = 128.0f;
    const float texHalfHeight = 128.0f;
    printf("INIT: \n");

    unsigned char* pData = new unsigned char[texWidth*texHeight*4];
    for(int y=0; y<texHeight; ++y){
        for(int x=0; x<texWidth; ++x){
            int offs = (x + y*texWidth) * 4;
            float xoffs = ((float)x - texHalfWidth) / texHalfWidth;
            float yoffs = ((float)y - texHalfWidth) / texHalfHeight;
            float alpha = 1.0f - std::sqrt(xoffs*xoffs + yoffs*yoffs);
            if(alpha < 0.0f)
                alpha = 0.0f;
            pData[offs + 0] = 255; //r
            pData[offs + 1] = 0; //g
            pData[offs + 2] = 0; //b
            pData[offs + 3] = 255.0f * alpha; // * 
            //printf("alpha: %f\n", pData[x + y*texWidth + 3]);
        }
    }

    #ifdef ENABLE_TEXTURE
    glGenTextures(1, &texture_name);
    glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
    glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, texture_name);
    glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGBA, texWidth, texHeight, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, pData);
    glEnable(GL_POINT_SPRITE);
    glTexEnvi(GL_POINT_SPRITE, GL_COORD_REPLACE, GL_TRUE);
    glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_TEXTURE_ENV_MODE, GL_REPLACE);
    glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
    glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
    glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE);
    glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE);
    #endif

    glPointSize(32.0f);

    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glOrtho(0, Width, 0, Height, -1.0f, 1.0f);
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();

    glEnable(GL_BLEND);
    glBlendFunc(GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA);
    glDisable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);

    #ifdef ENABLE_MULTISAMPLE
        glEnable(GL_POINT_SMOOTH);
    #endif

    GLenum e;
    do{
        e = glGetError();
        printf("%s\n",gluErrorString(e));
    } while(e != GL_NO_ERROR);

    delete [] pData;
}

void Draw(void)
{
    const int gridWidth = 1024;
    const int gridHeight = 1024;
    float t1, t2;

    t1 = t2 = (float)SDL_GetTicks() * 0.001f;
    t1 = fmod(t1, 10.0f) / 10.0f;
    t2 = fmod(t2, 4.0f) / 4.0f;
    float scale = 0.5f + (-sin(t2 * 2.0 * M_PI) + 1.0f) * 1.2f;
    //glColor4f(0.4f, 0.5f, 0.9f, 1.0f);
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
    glLoadIdentity();

    glTranslatef((Width>>1), (Height>>1), 0.0f);
    glScalef(scale,scale,scale);
    glRotatef(t1 * 360.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);

    glBegin(GL_POINTS);
    for(int j=0; j<gridHeight; j+=64){
        for(int i=0; i<gridWidth; i+=64){ 
            glVertex2i(i-(gridWidth>>1),j-(gridHeight>>1));
        }
    }
    glEnd();
}
share|improve this answer
    
And what about the reference I cited at the other comment? If I don't misunderstand it, it suggests that GL_POINT_SMOOTH does make circular points. Or do I? –  Tamás Szelei Oct 3 '09 at 15:31
    
Yes, I read about that and tried it out. Funny, I didn't know :-) –  Mads Elvheim Oct 3 '09 at 17:43
1  
Thank you for the very detailed answer. –  Tamás Szelei Oct 3 '09 at 18:59
    
You're very much welcome. Feel free to meet more of us on ##opengl and ##opengl3 on the FreeNode IRC-network. –  Mads Elvheim Oct 3 '09 at 20:55

Mads' answer provides everything you need if you go for the fixed function pipeline. However, if you have a system that does not provide the ARB_point_sprite extension or with a broken implementation (some ATI drivers), you can solve this part also with geometry shaders. The ARB_geometry_shader4 extension allows you to convert a point primitive to two triangles, which can be used as the quad created by the ARB_point_sprite extension. On OpenGL 3.2, geometry shaders are already supported in core, no extension needed. The OpenGL wiki has two examples.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mention of geometry shader, which is what you should always use anyway if supported (back in 2009 and likewise today). The reason being that not all GPUs support guard bands, and you have no way of knowing whether or not they do. If they don't, points and point sprites will pop in and pop out as they move close to the clip rectangle. When the point sprite's center point goes out of the rectangle, the visible half of the point sprite suddenly "disappears". Plus, point sizes are usually limited to around 64px. –  Damon Sep 5 '13 at 9:14

Not possible with a fixed opengl function. Dots are always square :)

You have to draw your own circle (by building it up like a cake, piece by piece) or draw a GL_QUAD with a "circle" texture on.

best regards, andre

share|improve this answer
2  
so what GL_POINT_SMOOTH is good for then? –  Tamás Szelei Oct 3 '09 at 14:18
    
According to the opengl reference: "If antialiasing is enabled, then point rasterization produces a fragment for each pixel square that intersects the region lying within the circle having diameter equal to the current point size and centered at the point's x w y w . The coverage value for each fragment is the window coordinate area of the intersection of the circular region with the corresponding pixel square." –  Tamás Szelei Oct 3 '09 at 14:31
3  
Actually, it is possible, but it's up to the OpenGL driver how well (or even whether) it'll work. In my testing, it gives round points with nVidia hardware/driver, but with ATI/AMD hardware/driver, it gives square points. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 3 '09 at 18:51

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