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I am not clear on the use of @property (advantages and disadvantages). I want to ask for some example using this class built with the help of Martijn.

The data (in text format) always has a x,y, and z to characterize a point (1, 2, and 3 columns of text file). Sometimes I have a "classification" (4th column) attribute and/or location (5th column). Depending on how the file is processed (sometimes more attributes).

class Point(object):
    __slots__= ("x", "y", "z", "data", "_classification")
    def __init__(self, x, y, z):
        self.x = float(x)
        self.y = float(y)
        self.z = float(z)
        self.data = [self.x,self.y,self.z]

    @property
    def classification(self):
        return getattr(self, '_classification', None)

    @classification.setter
    def classification(self, value):
        self._classification = value
        if value:
            self.data = self.data[:3] + [value]
        else:
            self.data = self.data[:3]

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.data)


p = Point(10,20,30)
len(p)
3
p.classification = 1
len(p)
4
p.data
[10.0, 20.0, 30.0, 1]

I wish to add location when classification is already set in order to understand the philosophy of using a @property. I tried with the following code but I don't know if this is pythonic or not:

class Point(object):
    __slots__= ("x", "y", "z", "data", "_classification",'_location')
    def __init__(self, x, y, z):
        self.x = float(x)
        self.y = float(y)
        self.z = float(z)
        self.data = [self.x,self.y,self.z]

    @property
    def classification(self):
        return getattr(self, '_classification', None)

    @classification.setter
    def classification(self, value):
        self._classification = value
        if value:
            self.data = self.data[:3] + [value]
        else:
            self.data = self.data[:3]

    @property
    def location(self):
        return getattr(self, '_location', None)

    @location.setter
    def location(self, value):
        self._location = value
        if value:
            self.data = self.data[:4] + [value]
        else:
            self.data = self.data[:4]

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.data)



p = Point(10,20,30)
p.classification = 1
p.data
[10.0, 20.0, 30.0, 1]
p.location = 100
p.data
[10.0, 20.0, 30.0, 1, 100]


p = Point(10,20,30)
p.location = 100
p.data
[10.0, 20.0, 30.0, 100]
share|improve this question
    
So location is only ever set if classification has been set? – Martijn Pieters Feb 28 '13 at 15:56
    
You can replace the getattr with a simple self._classification – lolopop Feb 28 '13 at 16:22
    
no, in some data there is only location, other data classification and in other both. I am thinking if it's convenient set classification = None and/or location = None. Es: p.location = 1 is p.data return [10.0,20.0,30.0,None,1] – Gianni Spear Feb 28 '13 at 16:23

So, your class works, and you're just asking whether it's Pythonic. I'm not an expert, but I will refer you to the Zen of Python:

Explicit is better than implicit.

To me, when you set one property (location, classification) and it ends up silently modifying other attributes, that is implicit, not explicit. I think a better, more cleanly understood use case would be to have something like an assign_location and/or assign_classification methods. That way the person using the API can know that he's not just setting an attribute, he's calling a function that has a docstring explaining what it does.

As for what the philosophy of the property is, I'm not sure its inclusion was based so much on philosophy. What the property decorator did was get rid of unsightly things like this:

class Foo:
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        if attr == 'location':
            ...
        elif attr == 'classification':
            ...

One use I'm quite fond of is using properties to make things thread safe. For example:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.lock = threading.Lock()
    @property
    def classification(self):
        return self.classification

    @classification.setter
    def classification(self, value):
        with self.lock:
            (something else thread-protected)
            self.classification = value

Finally, another piece of advice. Unless you know why you're using slots, don't. Unless you know why you need slots, you don't need them.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure your last example works. AFAIR the setter method must be named the same way as the property, or the property will not have this setter bound to it: it is setClassification = classification.setter(setClassification), so only setClassification will be affected, but not classification. – glglgl Mar 1 '13 at 9:43
    
@glglgl Thanks! Fixed. – Ken Kinder Mar 1 '13 at 18:42

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