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I have the following code so far

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    ofstream outfile;
    ifstream infile;
    string line;

    infile.open ("input.DAT");
    outfile.open ("output.txt");

    while (infile.good()){
        getline (infile, line);
        outfile << line << endl;
    }

    outfile.close();
    infile.close();

    return 0;
}

All this does is take what it's input.DAT and output it to output.txt. The input file is not clean, though. It's in this type of format:

(ASCII GARBAGE) 1:66 OS WARSAW, POLAND (ASCII GARBAGE)

Example pic:


Another example:


So what I want to do is output the stuff between the garbage, newline delimited. But I don't know how to iterate/output by character and what a good way is to dictate what's a valid output (I mean I could check if the character is within a particular range I suppose but I don't know how this is done in C++).

I think what may help is to start by searching for something in the form of (Number)(Number)(Colon)(Number)(Space) or (Number)(Colon)(Number)(Space) and then taking everything up until something that isn't a letter/comma/period/etc, and adding a newline. Can this be done?

I hope this makes sense! Let me know if I need to clarify more.

EDIT: First attempt

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    ofstream outfile;
    ifstream infile;
    string line, res;

    infile.open ("input.DAT");
    outfile.open ("output.txt");

    while (infile.good()){
        std::getline(infile, line);

        res = "";
        for(std::string::size_type i = 0; i < line.length()-4; i++){
            if (isdigit(line[i+1]) && line[i+2]==":" && isdigit(line[i+3])){
                res+=line[i];
                i++;
                while (isalnum(line[i]) || line[i] == "/" || line[i] == "\\" || line[i] == "=" || line[i] == "#" || line[i] == ":" || line[i] == " " || line[i] == "." || line[i] == "," || line[i] == "-" || line[i] == "'" || line[i] == '"'){
                    res+=line[i];
                    i++;
                }
                outfile << res << endl;
                res = "";
            }  
        }


    }

    outfile.close();
    infile.close();

    return 0;
}

It does not compile though because "ISO C++ forbids comparison between pointer and integer "

edit: Fixed this myself, changed the quotes to single-quotes. I think I figured out my own problem here. It won't let me delete my question though.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by jogojapan, WiredPrairie, towi, Troy Alford, MainMa Mar 1 '13 at 22:45

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
So what IS valid input and what isn't? "ASCII garbage" means what? –  Mats Petersson Feb 28 '13 at 14:59
    
@MatsPetersson I added a few examples to the OP –  MyNameIsKhan Feb 28 '13 at 15:06
    
@AgainstASicilian instead of reading it in line by line I would recommend my solution reading it in one character at a time. –  andre Feb 28 '13 at 16:13
    
You should ask a more specific question, or split this "fix my program" question into several. –  towi Mar 1 '13 at 22:11

2 Answers 2

I will leave it up to you to decide what is garbage and what is not. Here is an example of how you can remove all symbols you don't like from every line before writing it to another file:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

static bool is_garbage(char c)
{
    return !isalnum(c); // This is my perception on garbage. Yours might be different.
}

int main()
{
    std::ofstream outfile;
    std::ifstream infile;
    std::string line;

    infile.open("input.DAT");
    outfile.open("output.txt");

    while (infile.good()) {
        std::getline(infile, line);
        line.erase(std::remove_if(line.begin(), line.end(), is_garbage),
                   line.end());
        outfile << line << std::endl;
    }

    outfile.close();
    infile.close();
}

The above code removes everything that is not an alphabetic character. And here are some references that explain each function in more details:

Hope it helps. Good Luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I think what may help is to start by searching for something in the form of (Number)(Number)(Colon)(Number)(Space) or (Number)(Colon)(Number)(Space) and then taking everything up until something that isn't a letter/comma/period/etc, and adding a newline. Can this be done? –  MyNameIsKhan Feb 28 '13 at 15:14
    
@AgainstASicilian: It sure can, but how is that better than just removing non-alphanumeric characters? –  user405725 Feb 28 '13 at 15:15
    
The resulting output is basically a huge single string of letters/numbers when I do something like that, and not all letters/numbers are necessarily valid. –  MyNameIsKhan Feb 28 '13 at 15:16
    
@AgainstASicilian: Well, I can't really tell you what to do, but surely you can go differently about this — use std::string::find‌​, or even regular expressions (i.e. std::regex_replace). If that possible to determine the format of your input, that would probably be the best. I bet it is some format, not a random garbage. –  user405725 Feb 28 '13 at 15:19
    
How can I iterate until I come across characters that fit this template and then output everything up until something isn't a character/space/period/colon/etc? –  MyNameIsKhan Feb 28 '13 at 15:21

So, a function like this:

#include <cctype>

std::string clean_string(const std::string &str)
{
    std::string res;
    for(std::string::size_type i = 0; i < str.length(); i++)
    {
       if (std::isprint(str[i])
          res += str[i];
    }
    return res;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Chances are that unsigned int might not be enough to store std::string::size_type. This also creates an extra copy of the string for no good reason. –  user405725 Feb 28 '13 at 15:14
    
Yes, of course. But it's relatively simple to understand what it does, and none of the examples given show strings that are more than about 60 bytes long, so worrying about strings that are at least 64KB (and probably 4GB) is a little unreasonable. –  Mats Petersson Feb 28 '13 at 15:16
    
Yeah I never saw an 8GB string in my life :) –  user405725 Feb 28 '13 at 15:16
    
No, I don't think I have either. I have seen code behaving badly from being given symbols from a symbol file where the templated mangled symbol was about 9KB, and apparently the code had decided that around 1KB was "quite suffiicent" for the strings - and no checking either, it just overflowed the stack and crashed when trying to return to "four bytes picked out of the symbol name". –  Mats Petersson Feb 28 '13 at 15:19
    
Can't one just use a size_t? –  MyNameIsKhan Feb 28 '13 at 15:27

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