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With a simple bash script I generate a text file with many lines like this:

192.168.1.1
hostname1
192.168.1.2
hostname2
192.168.1.3
hostname3

Now I want to reformat this file so it looks like this:

192.168.1.1 hostname1
192.168.1.2 hostname2
192.168.1.3 hostname3

How would I reformat it this way? Perhaps sed?

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1  
why don't you generate you file in the desirable format to begin with? – SilentGhost Oct 3 '09 at 14:27
up vote 17 down vote accepted
$ sed '$!N;s/\n/ /' infile
192.168.1.1 hostname1
192.168.1.2 hostname2
192.168.1.3 hostname3
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Would you please explain how it come to be? – NawaMan Oct 3 '09 at 14:57
    
thanks. exactly what i search. :) – fwaechter Oct 3 '09 at 15:03
3  
@NawaMan: If you mean "how does it work?" then: If not (!) the last line ($) then append the next line (N) and replace the newline between them with a space (s/\n/ /) and repeat starting with the next line (which will be the 3rd, 5th, etc.). – Dennis Williamson Oct 3 '09 at 17:07
    
:-D Thanks. The just too crypt-ed. – NawaMan Oct 3 '09 at 23:20

Here's a shell-only alternative:

while read first; do read second; echo "$first $second"; done
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But you should always use -r flag with read. – Aleks-Daniel Jakimenko-A. Jan 25 '14 at 0:32

I love the simplicity of this solution

cat infile | paste -sd ' \n'

192.168.1.1 hostname1
192.168.1.2 hostname2
192.168.1.3 hostname3

or make it comma separated instead of space separated

cat infile | paste -sd ',\n'

and if your input file had a third line like timestamp

192.168.1.1
hostname1
14423289909
192.168.1.2
hostname2
14423289910
192.168.1.3
hostname3
14423289911

then the only change is to add another space in to the delimiter list

cat infile | paste -sd '  \n'

192.168.1.1 hostname1 14423289909
192.168.1.2 hostname2 14423289910
192.168.1.3 hostname3 14423289911
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