Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following code:

a(X) :- b(X),!,c(X),fail.
a(X) :- d(X).

b(1).
b(4).
c(1).
c(3).

d(4).

The query a(X). produces

1 ?- a(X).
false.

2 ?-

but with this code

a(X) :- b(X),!,c(X).
a(X) :- d(X).

b(1).
b(4).
c(1).
c(3).

d(4).

The query a(X). results in :

1 ?- a(X).
X = 1.

So my question is, why does the fail/1 produces false? it is supposed to force backtracking, right ? then b(1) and c(1). would be checked, I think, so why does it fail?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

it fails because fail must fail.

The cut removes alternatives, then forbids values that otherwise would be 'returned' by means of X binding. Try

a(X) :- b(X),c(X),fail.
...

you'll get

?- a(X).
X = 4.
share|improve this answer
    
But the cut/1 checks only X=1 , doesn't it ? then it would check both b(1) and c(1) . Am I wrong ? –  ron Feb 28 '13 at 15:17
    
cut it's a nasty theme. See if you can follow the documentation –  CapelliC Feb 28 '13 at 15:23

As @CapelliC said , the rule of a(X) :- b(X),!,c(X),fail. must fails because he has fail component .

At the 1st code sample - the checking starts on 1 , the component b(1) satisfied and after that it get to ! , therefore no more optional checking would execute .

For more clarification about the cut , you can examine putting the ! at end of a(X) :- b(X),!,c(X),fail.

like this -

a(X) :- b(X),c(X),fail,!.
a(X) :- d(X).

b(1).
b(4).
c(1).
c(3).

d(4).

And now -

?- a(X).
X = 4.

Because the fail is before the ! so the ! is unreachable therefore the cut does not affect and still another optional taking account .

Edit :

The fail is relevant only for the rule he written there , so a(X) :- b(X),c(X),fail,!. would forever causes the failure , but not the a(X) :- d(X). rule .

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.