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I am writing a nor calculator using Flex and Bison. Here is my .l file:

%{
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "y.tab.h"
%}

%% 
("true"|"false")    {return BOOLEAN;}
"nor"               {return NOR;}
.                   {return yytext[0];}

%%

int main(void)
{
    yyparse();
    return 0;
}

int yywrap(void)
{
     return 0;
}
int yyerror(void)
{
    getchar();
    printf("Error\n");
}

Here is my .y file:

/* Bison declarations.  */
 %token BOOLEAN
 %token NOR
 %left 'nor'

 %% /* The grammar follows.  */
 input:
   /* empty */
 | input line
 ;

 line:
   '\n'
 | exp '\n'  { printf ("%s",$1); }
 ;

 exp:
   BOOLEAN            { $$ = $1;           }
 | exp 'nor' exp      { $$ = !($1 || $3);  }
 | '(' exp ')'        { $$ = $2;           }
 ;
 %%

The problem is that if I type an input such as "true nor false", the lexer only gets to return BOOLEAN, then return yytext[0], then throws my error (in the flex code). Anyone see what's wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, I meant my error - the one in my flex code. –  John Roberts Feb 28 '13 at 15:11
    
I removed the Flex tag (which is used for the Adobe/Apache UI Framework) and replaced it w/ gnu-flex which is used for the lexical analyzer. –  JeffryHouser Feb 28 '13 at 15:18
3  
Since flex has a rule to return NOR when it sees "nor", your bison exp clause for that case should be exp NOR exp, I think. Also, in the BOOLEAN case, you're not converting the associated string to an actual boolean value, so later when you try to calculate the result, it's not doing what you think it is. There's probably more... –  twalberg Feb 28 '13 at 15:48
    
Substituting exp NOR exp allowed me to get to all the tokens, but now I get the message "conflicts: 1 shift/reduce". Any clue what's causing that? –  John Roberts Feb 28 '13 at 15:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

the problem is here :

%left 'nor'

and

exp:
   BOOLEAN            { $$ = $1;           }
 | exp 'nor' exp      { $$ = !($1 || $3);  }
 | '(' exp ')'        { $$ = $2;           }
 ;

you'v written 'nor' as a terminal token, your parser can't recognize 'nor' as token, so you should substitute this by NOR as the lexer returns:

"nor"               {return NOR;}

solution

    %left NOR

and 

    exp:
       BOOLEAN            { $$ = $1;           }
     | exp NOR exp      { $$ = !($1 || $3);  }
     | '(' exp ')'        { $$ = $2;           }
     ;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this helped me parse through my entire input string. However, I don't seem to be producing any result output. Do you know why this might be? –  John Roberts Feb 28 '13 at 16:06
    
have you ever defined your YYSTYPE, the default type for YYSTYPE is int, so if you want to write your result you should first redefine the YYSTYPE as char *, than in your lexer you evaluate your yylval(to be able to stock values in $1,$2 ...) and $$ will get the whole result –  Aymanadou Feb 28 '13 at 16:12

Your lexer also needs to recognize white space. Make another rule " ". You don't need an action

share|improve this answer
    
This allowed me to get to the "nor" part of my statement, but I'm still unable to reach the "false" part. –  John Roberts Feb 28 '13 at 15:40

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