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I'm sorry for posting such a big chunk of code, but in this case I felt it would be easier to understand the question, despite the question potentially being very simple (with an equally simple answer I hope).

I'm playing with Events and Delegates. Within my Main method I have the code

traffic.PutInGarage(g);

This means I'm passing a reference of my Garage class (see code below). Is this how you would expect the Event to be passed? I don't why, I can't explain why, it feels wrong, like I've missed the point some where.

Again, sorry for posting all the Console Application code but it may be easier.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace DemoProejct
{
    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Garage g = new Garage();
            g.NewCarEvent += new Garage.NewCarDelegate(GarageCount);

            Traffic traffic = new Traffic();

            //SHOULD I BE PASSING THE Garage object here?

            traffic.PutInGarage(g);

            Console.WriteLine("Garage is now closed");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static void GarageCount(string cars, string s)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} {1}", cars, s));
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000);
        }
    }

    public class Traffic
    {
        public void PutInGarage(Garage g)
        {
            List<Vehicle> all = GetVehicles();

            Vehicle modelWeFix = new Vehicle() { Make = "Mazda", Model = "6", Year = "2012" };
            int i = 1;
            foreach (IEquatabled<Vehicle> item in all)
            {
                if (item.EqualsTo(modelWeFix))
                {
                    g.CarsInGarage = i;
                    i++;
                }
            }
        }

   private List<Vehicle> GetVehicles()
   {
        Car carMazda = new Car() { Make = "Mazda", Model = "6", Year = "2012" };
        Car carFord = new Car() { Make = "Ford", Model = "Sport", Year = "2002" };
        Car carUnknown = new Car() { Make = "Mazda", Model = "5", Year = "2012" };
        Bike mazdaBike = new Bike() { Make = "Mazda", Model = "6", Year = "2012" };

        IEquatabled<Vehicle> unknownBike = mazdaBike;

        List<Vehicle> all = new List<Vehicle>();
        all.Add(carMazda);
        all.Add(carFord);
        all.Add(carUnknown);
        all.Add(mazdaBike);
        return all;
   }
}

    public class Garage
    {
        public delegate void NewCarDelegate(string numberOfCars, string message);
        public event NewCarDelegate NewCarEvent;

        private int _carsInGarage;
        public int CarsInGarage
        {
            get { return _carsInGarage; }
            set
            {
                if (NewCarEvent != null)
                {
                    _carsInGarage = value;
                    NewCarEvent(value.ToString(), " cars in the garage.");
                }
            }
        }

        public Garage()
        {
            CarsInGarage = 0;
        }
    }

    public class Vehicle : IEquatabled<Vehicle>
    {
        public string Make { get; set; }
        public string Model { get; set; }
        public string Year { get; set; }
        public virtual int Wheels { get; set; }

        //Implementation of IEquatable<T> interface 
        public bool EqualsTo(Vehicle car)
        {
            if (this.Make == car.Make && this.Model == car.Model && this.Year == car.Year)
                return true;
            else
                return false;
        }

    }

    public class Car : Vehicle
    {}

    public class Bike : Vehicle
    {}

    interface IEquatabled<T>
    {
        bool EqualsTo(T obj);
    }
}
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5  
Surely the method should be on the Garage object? Garage.StoreTraffic(traffic) - the implementation seems backwards. The traffic should not be responsible for the garages behaviour... –  Charleh Feb 28 '13 at 15:25
2  
Sorry, what's the question? Is this how you would expect the Event to be passed? You don't pass events - you pass instances. –  Tim Rogers Feb 28 '13 at 15:25
    
@Charleh - I think you've nailed it! I've been trying to understand events and done events and delegates and inheritance in one go and I don't think I can see the wood for the trees! Thank you. –  Dave Feb 28 '13 at 15:28
    
The code seems ok, but in Garage.CarsInGarage set property you assign the value only if the event is not null, you should to update the value always. The check if not null is only to fire the event. –  RoadBump Feb 28 '13 at 15:28
    
+1 to Charley, it would make more sense for the Garage to be responsible for the traffic. –  NDJ Feb 28 '13 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

Don't pass it in to every call to put in garage, but would it make more sense to create an instance of Traffic with the garage.

        Garage g = new Garage();
        g.NewCarEvent += new Garage.NewCarDelegate(GarageCount);

        Traffic traffic = new Traffic(g); // pass your garage here.

        traffic.PutInGarage();
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer suggests though it's fine to pass an instance of Garage. Is that correct, or are you doing this just because my code does? –  Dave Feb 28 '13 at 15:27
    
this is my answer without addressing the potential backwards implementation as mentioned, but if you have a class which depends on the other, create the class with an instance of the dependancy. –  hometoast Feb 28 '13 at 15:28
3  
So traffic can only be associated with one garage? Sounds like that garage has a monopoly. –  Tim Rogers Feb 28 '13 at 15:28
    
@DaveRook, I'm passing an instance of the garage to the constructor for Traffic. –  hometoast Feb 28 '13 at 15:29
    
@Tim, I was just looking at Traffic as having a dependancy on Garage, if it's to be the same garage all the time, then I would give traffic a garage. Whether or not this makes sense "on the street", I don't care. –  hometoast Feb 28 '13 at 15:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Answered in comments:

Surely the method should be on the Garage object? Garage.StoreTraffic(traffic) - the implementation seems backwards. The traffic should not be responsible for the garages behaviour... . – Charleh Feb 28 at 15:25

This showed I did need to pass an instance as a parameter but also helped to fix my implementation!

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