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I'm in a scenario where I'm looping through data and formatting it in specific ways based on a setting, and I'm concerned that what I feel is best stylistically might impede performance.

The basic pattern of the code is as follows

enum setting {single, multiple, foo, bar};
Data data = getData(Connection conn, int id);
setting blah = data.getSetting();
foreach (Item item in data)
{
   switch(blah)
   {
      case blah.single:
        processDataSingle(item blah);
        break;
      ...
   }
}

My concern is that there might be thousands, or even tens of thousands of items in data. I was wondering if having the switch inside the loop where it may be evaluated repeatedly might cause some serious performance issues. I know I could put the switch before the loop, but then each case contains it, which seems much less readable, in that it's less apparent that the basic function remains the same.

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5  
Can you post the full switch? We'd be able to advise the best solution if we knew the exact functioning of the code –  mattytommo Feb 28 '13 at 15:33
3  
Have you done a performance test? Make the 2 solutions, use a lot of data >1000, and time it :) –  RvdK Feb 28 '13 at 15:33
    
Sometimes splitting the workload according to blah and (concurrently) processing the now-uniform 'shards' is effective. Impossible to tell from the posted code, though –  sehe Feb 28 '13 at 15:35
    
Have you profiled the code and determined that this is indeed your bottleneck? –  Ryan Gates Feb 28 '13 at 15:40
    
This code makes no sense. It seems like it is a completely backward approach to the problem, but since we don't really know what the problem is (too abstract), there's not much that can be done... –  rmayer06 Feb 28 '13 at 15:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could set up a delegate/action once, then call it every time in the loop:

Data data = getData(Connection conn, int id);
setting blah = data.getSetting();
Action<Item> doThis;
switch (blah)
{
  case blah.single:
      doThis = i => processSingleData(i blah);
      break;
  ...
}
foreach (Item item in data)
{
    doThis(item);
}

Basically, put the body of each "case" in an Action, select that Action in your switch outside the loop, and call the Action in the loop.

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Oh, this is a nice one. –  Larry Feb 28 '13 at 15:45
    
Oooh, I like this idea. It seems to have both the readability I was looking for and increased performance. Thanks! –  Sconibulus Feb 28 '13 at 15:46

You could create a method to keep readability, then pass the data to the method:

void processAllData(IEnumerable<Item> data,  setting blah)
{
    switch(blah)
    {
      case blah.single:
        foreach (Item item in data)
        {

        }
    }
    // next case, next loop ...
}

Then it's just a one-liner:

processAllData(data, blah);

This approach is readable since it encapsulates complexity, concise since you only see what you have to see and efficient since you can optimize the cases.

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Doesn't this just move the issue from one place to another? –  Sconibulus Feb 28 '13 at 15:49
    
@Sconibulus: It increases readability but does not affect performance. If code gets more and more complex you should refactor it. The easiest way is to extract methods. This hides complexity and also allows to reuse it. Edit: But maybe you want to combine it with Rawlings approach ;) –  Tim Schmelter Feb 28 '13 at 15:51

By using a Action delegate this way, you can factorize your code a lot

enum setting {single, multiple, foo, bar};
Data data = getData(Connection conn, int id);

var processAll = new Action<Action<item>>(action =>
                    {
                        foreach(var item in data)                           
                            action(item);
                    });

setting blah = data.getSetting();

switch(blah)
{
    case blah.single:
       processAll(item => processDataSingle(item, blah));
       break;
       ...
}
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It certainly does have the potential to affect performance if you're talking about possibly running the comparison tens of thousands of times or more. The other problem that could potentially arise in the code that you've written here is what happens if you need to add to your enum. Then you'd need to open up this code and adjust it to take care of that circumstance, which violates the Open/Closed Principle.

The best way, IMO, to solve both problems at once would be to use a Factory pattern to take care of this (see posts here and here for some advice on starting that). All you'd need to do is have an interface whose implementations would call the method that you'd want to call in your switch code above. Create a factory and have it pick which implementation to return back to your code (before the loop) based on the enum passed in. At that point all your loop needs to do is to call that interface method which will do exactly what you wanted.

Afterwards, any future feature additions will only require you to create another implementation of that interface, and adjust the enum accordingly. No muss, no fuss.

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The enum is actually a private thing I created to improve identification of the meanings of values pulled down through the Setting field, so the code has to be opened anyway. I'll keep this in mind for when I refactor this and similar processes. –  Sconibulus Feb 28 '13 at 15:54

It's almost certainly slower to put the switch in the loop like that. Whether it's significant or not is impossible to say - use a Stopwatch to see.

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If the values in the switch statement are near one to another, the compiler will produce a lookup table instead of N if statements. It increases performance, but it's hard to say when the compiler will decide to do this.
Instead you can create a Dictionary<switchType,Delegate>, populate it with pairs of value-action, and then selecting the appropriate action will take about O(1) as dictionary is a hash table.
dictionary[value].Invoke().

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