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How to generate lexicographical strings of a given length?

I am looking for an algorithm to generate strings (lexicographic order) of length N, in lexicographical order. For example given a length 1, the strings generated are: "a","b","c","d","e","f",g,h,i,j,k...,z.

For length 2, the strings generated should be: "aa","ab","ac","ad",...,"ba","bb",...,"zz".

How could we do this?

Here is what I have done:

  void permute(string a, int i, int n, int length)
   {
       int j;
       if (i == length){
           string cand = a.substr(0,length);
              cout<<cand<<endl;
         }

       else
          {
                     for (j = i; j <= n; j++)
                      {
                          swap((a[i]), (a[j]));
                           permute(a, i+1,n,length);
                           swap((a[i]), (a[j]));
                      }
           }
       }

While calling "permute(a,0,a.size(),1)" where the string a looks like this:

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbccccccccccccccccccccddddddddddddddddddddeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeffffffffffffffffffffgggggggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkllllllllllllllllllllmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnooooooooooooooooooooppppppppppppppppppppqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrssssssssssssssssssssttttttttttttttttttttuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Generates the correct output but it's repeating the lexicographic strings. If I reduce it to just alphabets I believe strings like "aa", "aaaa" will be missed. So how could we get around this,Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
That seems really basic, you know? –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 28 '13 at 16:25
    
I would enlighten it as "too localized", but I like @aardvarkk solution –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 28 '13 at 16:28
    
What have you tried? Try with strings of length 1, then 2, then 3, then it should be obvious. –  Peter Wood Feb 28 '13 at 16:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would do a recursive call into a function that simply loops through the alphabet, and call it for each letter placement.

Preliminary testing shows this may work:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

void addLetters(std::string base, int tgt_depth)
{
    if (base.length() == tgt_depth) {
        std::cout << base << std::endl;
        return;
    }

    for (char letter = 'a'; letter <= 'z'; ++letter) {
        std::stringstream ss;
        ss << letter;
        addLetters(base + ss.str(), tgt_depth);
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv)
{
  // first argument is your "base" -- start with nothing
  // second argument is the depth to which to recurse, i.e. how many letters
  addLetters("", 2);
}
share|improve this answer

Assuming you want to see which string is in place M in the lexicographical order of these strings, represent this number in base 26 and than map 0 to a, 1 to b and so on. You will have to add zeros(or a-s) to the left until the string reaches the needed length. Now to solve your problem simply iterate through the integers(up to the number of string of length N which is 26N) and apply the conversion I suggest.

share|improve this answer
for(i='a';i<='z';i++)
{
    recur(new String(i));
}
void recur(String s)
{
   if(s.length()==dig)
   {
       add s to array
       return
   }
   for(i='a';i<='z';i++)
       recur(s+i);

}

Although this code is not feasable enough to generate more than 5 digits because there are 26^dig possibilities.And I dont know c++ so i have written the algorithm . But i feel there is nothing in it that a coder i a language cant convert

share|improve this answer

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