Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

www.amyyatsuk.com

I ran the code through the validator and it didn't like my method of incorporating a div within the un-ordered list. I'm trying to get an interior border on the drop down navigation menu.

What's the valid markup that would achieve this same effect?

HTML:

<div id="linksLeft">
    <ul class="menu">
        <li id="about"><a href="#">about</a></li>
        <li id="portfolio"><a href="editorial.html">portfolio</a>
        <ul class="subMenu" id="subNav"> **<div id="subnavborder">**
            <li><a href="editorial.html">editorial</a></li>
            <li><a href="advertising.html">advertising</a></li>
            <li><a href="packaging.html">packaging</a></li>
            <li><a href="photography.html">photography</a></li> **</div>**
        </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>
</div>

CSS:

#subnavborder {
    margin:10px;
    border: 6px solid white;
    border-radius:6px;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Two alternatives

Using regular borders regular fiddle. and Using internal borders internal fiddle

Regular borders You can achive your border styling the UL element with this class

.subnavborder {
    margin:10px;
    border: 6px solid black;
    border-radius:6px;
}

Unless for other reason , you dont need the div Markup as follows

<div id="linksLeft">
    <ul class="menu">
        <li id="about"><a href="#">about</a></li>
        <li id="portfolio"><a href="editorial.html">portfolio</a>
        <ul class="subMenu subnavborder" id="subNav"> 
            <li><a href="editorial.html">editorial</a></li>
            <li><a href="advertising.html">advertising</a></li>
            <li><a href="packaging.html">packaging</a></li>
            <li><a href="photography.html">photography</a></li> 
        </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>
</div>

See it in this regular fiddle. I changed the border color in order to show it Then adjust exceeding classes at will.

Alternative for internal border

If you want to keep the radius, you will need to use pseudo element selectors as in this example

I am using the same markup as before. The black border is there just to appreciate the inner border The position relative is needed because we will position the pseudo element refering this one

 .subnavborder {
       position:relative;

        border:1px solid black;
    }

As the inner border could conflict with the list decorations we apply some margin (at your will)

    .subnavborder li{
       margin:10px;
    }

Now the pseudo element

.subnavborder:after {
    border: 2px solid #ff0000;
    border-radius:6px;
    content: "";
    position: absolute;
    top: 3px;
    bottom: 3px;
    left: 3px;
    right: 3px;
}

Get it?. We are adding a ghost element . Modify the deep in pixels, color , etc See it working at this internal fiddle

No need of radius?? If you dont want to use pseudo-elements there is a solution using the property outline (but not with radius...) If you want it, ask for it and I include it here.

share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't what the OP wants. They want an "inner" border. You've just given the <ul> a normal border –  Bojangles Feb 28 '13 at 16:41
    
@Bojangles, You are right. I misss the interior esp. I extend ASAP my answer covering that matter –  Fico Feb 28 '13 at 17:38

If you're talking HTML5, you're also talking CSS3 which means box-shadow is commonly supported.

box-shadow supports an offset, which will allow you to appear to continue the background beyond the border.

Give this a go:

ul.subMenu {
    background-color: #93b9bb;
    border: 5px solid #fff

    /* Your other styles here */

    -moz-box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 10px #93b9bb;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 10px #93b9bb;
    -o-box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 10px #93b9bb;
    box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 10px #93b9bb;
}

Take a look at the JSFiddle.

This doesn't use a :before or :after pseudo-element hack which leaves you with cleaner CSS, as well as the fact the box shadow is more easily controlled (no position: absolute and left right, etc values). The fourth pixel value in the above box-shadow property defines the shadow offset. The 0px before it specifies a 0px blur i.e. a completely sharp shadow.

share|improve this answer
    
And my solution will work in ie8, while yours wont. –  watson Feb 28 '13 at 16:48
    
The OP wanted an "HTML5" solution, which generally means CSS3, and not caring about older browsers. I used box shadow because its the cleanest method. –  Bojangles Feb 28 '13 at 17:18

I would use the :after pseudo selector, like so:

Fiddle

.subMenu:after {
    content: '';
    display: block;
    border: 6px solid white;
    border-radius:6px;
    position: relative;
    width: figure it out;
    height: figure it out;
    left: figure it out;
    top: figure it out;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a terrible solution. You should at least be using position: absolute; and left, right, etc values –  Bojangles Feb 28 '13 at 16:41
    
@Bojangles Don't hate, it works great, check it out: jsfiddle.net/vfq7g Why should I use position: absolute;? –  watson Feb 28 '13 at 16:44
    
The only thing I hate is that expression. What happens when the content has a different width or height? You should use position absolute because it allows the "outer border thingy" to resize dynamically with the box content –  Bojangles Feb 28 '13 at 17:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.