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These both work:

class A:
    V = 3
    def getV(self):
        return self.V
    def getVbis(self):
        return A.V

print A().getV()
print A().getVbis()

Which one is more pythonic? Why?

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getVbis() is not wrong?? both are unequal code –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 28 '13 at 16:38
1  
They do different things. You've defined V as a variable of the class A, not as a variable of instances of A. It's shared between all classes. However, trying to get self.V will, if self doesn't have an attribute V, look for an attribute V belonging to the class of self, which is why they both work. If you instantiate this multiple times though; both your setters, on all your instances, will refer to the same object shared between all instances of the class - although that probably won't trip you up here, since ints are immutable, and assigning to self.V will create an instance attribute. –  Mark Amery Feb 28 '13 at 16:40
    
If you conceptually want V to be an attribute of the instance rather than the class, you should do self.V = 3 in your __init__ method for the instance, instead of V=3 in your class definition. –  Mark Amery Feb 28 '13 at 16:42
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

self.V contains the value of an instance variable, while A.V contains the value of a class variable. Depending on what your class methods do to V and how they do it, getV and getVbis will return different things.

Here's an example:

class A:
    V = 3
    def getV(self):
        return self.V
    def getVbis(self):
        return A.V
    def setV(self, newVal):
        self.V = newVal

aInst = A()
print aInst.getV()
print aInst.getVbis()
aInst.setV(5)
print aInst.getV()
print aInst.getVbis()

The above code will result in the following:

3
3
5
3

So I don't think this is about which one is more Pythonic. Rather, it's about what you're trying to do with your class variables.

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It might not be pretty, but I prefer:

self.__class__.V

This way you don't have to explicitly refer to the class name, which makes subclassing easier, and there is no danger of accidentally getting an instance attribute rather than a class attribute.

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I myself do prefer to access class members (attributes and methods) as instance methods within instance methods. i do not know if it is more Pythonic or not, but it allows me to focus on interfaces, because I can always override the class member with an instance member. The class member in this case provides some useful defaut (value, or implementation).

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In spite of the actual meaning of your code, I think the getter/setter way is NOT that pythonic.

First the variable is by default public. The getter func makes it more complex;

Second if you want to have some constraint or some other logic in the getter/setter func, it should have a more obvious name which indicate the logic. The name getXXX means nothing.

Btw, if you really don't want to access the variable directly, there is another option: http://docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#property

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This was just an example. In my real code I am not implementing getter/setters. I am just using the class variable (which for me is a constant: I do not change it) in the objects, and I was not sure if self.V is preferred over A.V. –  jeckyll2hide Feb 28 '13 at 21:17
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