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as the title says, I have a situation like:

require_once("connect.php") //database connection file

class one {

    private $mysqli;

    function __construct ($dbi) {
        $this -> mysqli = $dbi;
    }

    function one {
        // ... function using things like $this -> mysqli -> prepare and so on...
    }
}

and, in the same file:

class two {
    private $mysqli;

    function __construct ($dbi) {
        $this -> mysqli = $dbi;
    }

    function two {
        // here I need to access the function "one" of the class "one"
        // If i do something like $one = new one ($mysqli) I get an error on the __construct
    }
}

I am really getting mad at this, but I believe that is not so difficult since I'm a beginner with OOP in PHP. Hope that soneone out there can help me.

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1  
Did you mean $one = new one ($this->mysqli)? You must use $this because $mysqli is undefined. –  Halcyon Feb 28 '13 at 16:42
    
Thank you, I think you got it right already. Can I ask how can I verify the existance of the variable $mysqli in PHP? –  wiredmark Feb 28 '13 at 16:45
    
My error was : Undefined variable: mysqli –  wiredmark Feb 28 '13 at 16:46
1  
isset($mysqli) or isset($this->mysqli)? but in your case, you're referring to the private variable of the class therefore $this-> is required. –  UnholyRanger Feb 28 '13 at 16:46
    
Since you're in a non static function you are guaranteed that $this->mysqli exists. That is, if you add a check in the constructor. isset is one way to check it, You could also add a type-hint in the constructor if it's an instance of a class. –  Halcyon Feb 28 '13 at 16:49

2 Answers 2

Ignoring the mysqli issue shouldn't it be something like this

$one = new one ($this->mysqli);

$two = new two($this->mysqli);
$two->two($one->one); // call pass function from one into two

and you'd change your declaration of 2 to be something like

function two($functiontorun) {

Now I'm not OO pro either in php (don't see the point in a non-out of order non-compiled language) but I believe you can also resolve this by having class 2 as an EXTENDS of class 1. Alternatively if you make your class 1 public and function one public then as long as class 1 is instanced with the new one etc before hand then you should inside of your function two be able to just call $one->one(); but I'm not 100% on that one

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My problem now is that inside function TWO i create new one ($this -> mysqli). When I check if $this -> mysqli is set in the function one, it exists. However when I try any SQL execute inside of it I get Call to a member function ... on a non-object –  wiredmark Feb 28 '13 at 16:57
    
because you're making $mysqli private it is limited to the scope of the class its called in. if you haven't instanced class one correctly then its private $mysqli variable won't be instanced ie: it'll be a non object. You're probably better instancing your $mysqli as a class in its own right with a public $mysqli->DB for the connection and then in the constructs for your other classes you'd do $this -> mysqli = $mysqli->DB; to bring your public mysqli connection into the local scope of your class. Ofc I could be talking rubbish :) –  Dave Feb 28 '13 at 17:00

Though I am not quite sure if I understand your question (because of all the MySQL stuff), access to a method (= a function within an object) can be given using the public keyword:

    public function functionName( $parameter ) {
        \\ function stuff
    }
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