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I made the following custom BlockJUnit4ClassRunner

  public class RepeatEachTest extends BlockJUnit4ClassRunner {

  private int repeats;

  public RepeatEachTest(Class<?> klass) throws InitializationError {
    super(klass);
    Repeat r = klass.getAnnotation(Repeat.class);
    if (r == null) {
        throw new InitializationError("A @Repeat annonation must also be suplied to class, for example @Repeat(5) to repeat 5 times");
    }
    repeats = r.value();
  }

  @Override
  protected void runChild(FrameworkMethod method, RunNotifier notifier) {
    for (int i = 0; i < repeats; i++) {
        super.runChild(method, notifier);
    }
  }

  @Override
  public int testCount() {
    return repeats * super.testCount();
  }
}

and

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.TYPE)
public @interface Repeat {  
 int value();
}

to execute each test @Repeat.value() number of times. A test run of

@RunWith(RepeatEachTest.class)
@Repeat(2)
public class RepeatEachTestTest {

  @Test
  public void first() {
    System.out.println("ran first");
  }

  @Test
  public void second() {
    System.out.println("ran second");
  }
}

looks like

ran first
ran first
ran second
ran second

but now I want to implement a second BlockJUnit4ClassRunner which runs the whole test class @Repeat.value() number of times. A run from that setup would look like

ran first
ran second
ran first
ran second

Any thoughts?

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That depends on what you want. If you want the @BeforeClass and @AfterClass methods and class rules to be called multiple times, you can override classBlock():

protected Statement classBlock(final RunNotifier notifier) {
  return new Statement() {
    @Override
    public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
      for (int i = 0; i < repeats; i++) {
        super.classBlock(notifier).evaluate();
      }
    }
  };
}

If you want the @BeforeClass and @AfterClass methods and class rules to be called once, override childrenInvoker() (the code would be similar).

Note, however, that either of these will result in the listeners being notified multiple times that the test has started and completed. Some listeners may not behave correctly in this situation.

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Works like a charm! Hmm I could probably write a test runner that runs all tests for a predetermined time and then stops... Pretty cool –  Theodor Mar 7 '13 at 18:11
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