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I'm trying to understand how Core Data works. For this I've tried to implement a simple entity named "Color" with these attributes :

  • value -> an NSColor to handle the color itself, bound to an NSColorWell
  • red -> a float value to handle the red component of the color, bound to an NSSlider
  • green -> same as red but for green component, bound to an NSSlider
  • blue -> blue component, bound to an NSSlider

For this I'm using a class named Color and I've overwritten - (id)value to get the color depending on components :

 @implementation Color

@dynamic blue;
@dynamic green;
@dynamic name;
@dynamic red;
@dynamic value;

- (id)value
{
    return [NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:self.red.floatValue green:self.green.floatValue blue:self.blue.floatValue alpha:1.0];
}


+ (NSSet *)keyPathsForValuesAffectingValue
{
    return [NSSet setWithArray:@[@"red", @"green", @"blue"]];
}

Every time I change a slider value the color adapts itself to components.

What I'd like to do is the inverse operation, when I set the color (drag'n drop or NSColorWell's color picker) the component adapt themselves. I've tried to implement this but it never works. I've tried too much things to paste them here (it would be irrelevant because it didn't work). How can I do this ? Understanding this could help me a lot to understand how Core Data works.

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Have you tried to implement a custom setter setValue? - Actually I would not use "value" as attribute name to avoid conflicts with all those key-value methods such as setValue:forKeyPath etc. – Martin R Feb 28 '13 at 19:20
    
You were right implementing setValue: solved the problem. I'll post the working piece of code right now. Thank you :) (the name isn't a problem, I think, as it's used on many apple's classes such as NSControl) – Pyroh Feb 28 '13 at 21:40

So here is the piece of code that made it work :

@implementation Color

@dynamic blue;
@dynamic green;
@dynamic name;
@dynamic red;
@dynamic value;

- (id)value
{
    return [NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:self.red.floatValue green:self.green.floatValue blue:self.blue.floatValue alpha:1.0];
}

- (void)setValue:(id)value
{
    [self willChangeValueForKey:@"value"];
    [self setPrimitiveValue:value forKey:@"value"];
    [self didChangeValueForKey:@"value"];
    [self setRed:@([(NSColor *)value redComponent])];
    [self setGreen:@([(NSColor *)value greenComponent])];
    [self setBlue:@([(NSColor *)value blueComponent])];
}

+ (NSSet *)keyPathsForValuesAffectingValue
{
    return [NSSet setWithArray:@[@"red", @"green", @"blue"]];
}

Now I can work on HSB sliders.

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