Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to create a class level decorator that automatically adds a property to an object, including the appropriate getter and setter methods and a backing variable. For example:

@autoproperty("foo", can_get=True, can_set=True, allow_null=False, default_value=0)
@autoproperty("baz", can_get=True, can_set=False, allow_null=True, default_value=0)
@autoproperty("bar")
class SomeNonTrivialClass(object):
   def __init__(self):
      #lots of stuff going on here

   def discombobulate(self):
      #this is obviously a very trivial example
      local_foo = self.foo;

      if (local_foo > 10):
         raise RuntimeError("Foo can never be more than 10")
      else:
         #do whatever with foo

if __name__ == '__main__':
   test = SomeNonTrivialClass()

   test.foo = 5
   test.discombobulate()
   test.foo = 11
   test.discombobulate()

I often find myself creating lots of "semi-complex" getters/setters (they could be done with just a simple property but they need default values and null protection. I would like to just be able to specify a decorator that does the heavy lifting of creating the properties on new instances of the class.

If I am way off base in this approach, I am open to an equally viable approach.

Any help would be appreciated.

I am working with python 3.X and python 2.7 so something that works in either is preferred but not necessary.

Update: I have added a bit more variety in what I am looking for. In general I need to be able to create a lot of these simple automatic properties (ala C# auto-property, but with a bit more flexibility). I do not necessarily want to expose the backing store, but I do want to make sure that an inspection of the instantiated object (not necessarily the class) shows the properties which have been created.

share|improve this question
    
it sounds like you might want to write some custom descriptors. –  Eevee Feb 28 '13 at 19:17
    
What is your question? –  Robᵩ Feb 28 '13 at 20:17
    
@Robᵩ my question is how to create a class level decorator that will automatically create the correct property on a class at instantiation. –  GrayWizardx Feb 28 '13 at 23:12
    
@Eevee, Im fairly new to python, I can create the descriptor itself but I am having trouble figuring out how to wire it up so that when I create a new instance of the class I have the property available, with the right constraints on the created instance, not necessarily on the class. –  GrayWizardx Feb 28 '13 at 23:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following class decorator would do that:

def autoproperty(name, can_get=True, can_set=True, allow_null=False, default_value=0):
    attribute_name = '_' + name
    def getter(self):
        return getattr(self, attribute_name, default_value)
    def setter(self, value):
        if not allow_null and value is None:
            raise ValueError('Cannot set {} to None'.format(name))
        setattr(self, attribute_name, value)

    prop = property(getter if can_get else None, setter if can_set else None)

    def decorator(cls):
        setattr(cls, name, prop)
        return cls

    return decorator

but you could just as well create a property factory:

def autoproperty(attribute_name, can_get=True, can_set=True, allow_null=False, default_value=0):
    def getter(self):
        return getattr(self, attribute_name, default_value)
    def setter(self, value):
        if not allow_null and value is None:
            raise ValueError('Cannot set {} to None'.format(name))
        setattr(self, attribute_name, value)
    return property(getter if can_get else None, setter if can_set else None)

then set that in the class with:

class SomeNonTrivialClass(object):
    # ...

    foo = autoproperty('_foo', can_get=True, can_set=True, allow_null=False, default_value=0)

The class decorator would make more sense if you needed to create multiple properties (perhaps with interdependencies) instead.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I need to do, I have a class who has maybe a dozen properties that need to be configured on it. –  GrayWizardx Feb 28 '13 at 23:06
    
This worked pretty close to what I wanted. Thanks. –  GrayWizardx Mar 1 '13 at 2:02

Here's a more direct approach, which avoids decorating the class.

class SomeNonTrivialClass(object):
   def __init__(self):
      #lots of stuff going on here

   foo = autoproperty("foo", can_get=True, can_set=True, allow_null=False, default_value=0)

   def discombobulate(self):
      #this is obviously a very trivial example
      local_foo = self.foo;

class autoproperty(property):
    def __init__(self, name, can_get, can_set, allow_null, default_value):
        ...
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a NameError to me (since autoproperty isn't defined when you try to create the class). Otherwise, a good suggestion as far as I can see ... –  mgilson Feb 28 '13 at 19:05
    
@mgilson : no NameError if you create instances after both classes body. –  cox Feb 28 '13 at 19:18
    
Part of why I need to decorate the class is that I dont necessarily know at design time what properties are needed. They are created from a prototyping factory facility, where the autoproperties are added afterwards. –  GrayWizardx Feb 28 '13 at 23:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.