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Got a large dataframe that I want to take slices of (according to multiple boolean criteria), and then modify the entries in those slices in order to change the original dataframe -- i.e. I need a view to the original. Problem is, fancy indexing always returns a copy. Thought of the .ix method, but boolean indexing with the df.ix[] method also returns a copy.

Essentially if df is my dataframe, I'd like a view to column C such that C!=0, A==10, B<30,... etc. Is there a fast way to do this in pandas?

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Even though df.loc[idx] may be a copy of a portion of df, assignment to df.loc[idx] modifies df itself. (This is also true of df.iloc and df.ix.)

For example,

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[9,10]*6,
                   'B':range(23,35),
                   'C':range(-6,6)})

print(df)
#      A   B  C
# 0    9  23 -6
# 1   10  24 -5
# 2    9  25 -4
# 3   10  26 -3
# 4    9  27 -2
# 5   10  28 -1
# 6    9  29  0
# 7   10  30  1
# 8    9  31  2
# 9   10  32  3
# 10   9  33  4
# 11  10  34  5

Here is our boolean index:

idx = (df['C']!=0) & (df['A']==10) & (df['B']<30)

We can modify those rows of df where idx is True by assigning to df.loc[idx, ...]. For example,

df.loc[idx, 'A'] += df.loc[idx, 'B'] * df.loc[idx, 'C']
print(df)

yields

      A   B  C
0     9  23 -6
1  -110  24 -5
2     9  25 -4
3   -68  26 -3
4     9  27 -2
5   -18  28 -1
6     9  29  0
7    10  30  1
8     9  31  2
9    10  32  3
10    9  33  4
11   10  34  5
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An excellent solution for most use cases. :) – Andy Hayden Feb 28 '13 at 20:19
    
Thanks... just what I was looking for! – optional Mar 3 '13 at 6:51
    
When I run the command subdf['A'] += subdf['B'] * subdf['C'], it does change the values but I get the following warning: A value is trying to be set on a copy of a slice from a DataFrame. Try using .loc[row_indexer,col_indexer] = value instead See the the caveats in the documentation: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/indexing.html#indexing-view-versus-c‌​opy # Used internally for debug sandbox under external interpreter. I then tried following the recommendation in this warning subdf.loc[:,'A'] += subdf['B'] * subdf['C'] and get the same warning again. What is correct? – stvn66 Sep 18 '15 at 1:19
    
@stvn66: The warning is saying that subdf is a copy of a slice of df, and assigning new values to a copy of a slice is often not desireable. For example, if one were to use df[idx]['A'] += df[idx]['B'] + df[idx]['C'] then df itself would not change because only df[idx] is modified and df[idx] is a copy of a slice of df. Modifying the copy does not modify the original. In this case, we assigned subdf to the copy and we want to modify subdf. So the code is doing what we want and the warning is overzealous. So you are free to ignore the warning. – unutbu Sep 18 '15 at 1:51
    
@stvn66: If you don't like seeing a warning, you could use subdf = df[idx].copy(). Then subdf['A'] += subdf['B'] * subdf['C'] will not raise a warning. This does however perform an unnecessary copy. Therefore another alternative is to turn off the warning with pd.options.mode.chained_assignment = None. – unutbu Sep 18 '15 at 1:51

The pandas docs have a section on Returning a view versus a copy:

The rules about when a view on the data is returned are entirely dependent on NumPy. Whenever an array of labels or a boolean vector are involved in the indexing operation, the result will be a copy. With single label / scalar indexing and slicing, e.g. df.ix[3:6] or df.ix[:, 'A'], a view will be returned.

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Building off of unutbu's example you could also use the boolean index on df.index like so:

In [11]: df.ix[df.index[idx]] = 999

In [12]: df
Out[12]:
      A    B    C
0     9   23   -6
1   999  999  999
2     9   25   -4
3   999  999  999
4     9   27   -2
5   999  999  999
6     9   29    0
7    10   30    1
8     9   31    2
9    10   32    3
10    9   33    4
11   10   34    5
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