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So, the code is compiling and running perfectly. However, usually, Conway's Game of life stabilizes after some time, while this code keeps running indefinitely without ever getting a dead branch, and I'd love if anybody could help me figuring out why.

int[][] world;
int SCALE_FACTOR = 4;
float DENSITY = 0.1;

void setup() {
  size(500,500);
  world = new int[width/SCALE_FACTOR][height/SCALE_FACTOR];
  for(int i = 0; i < width/SCALE_FACTOR; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < height/SCALE_FACTOR; j++) {
      int r = (int)random(100);
      world[i][j] = r % (int)(1/DENSITY) == 0 ? 1 : 0;
    }
  }
  frameRate(1);
  stroke(0, 255, 0);
}

void draw() {
  scale(SCALE_FACTOR);
  background(0);
  for(int i = 0; i < width/SCALE_FACTOR; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < height/SCALE_FACTOR; j++) {
      if (world[i][j] == 1) point(i, j);
    }
  }
  lifeCycle();    
}

void lifeCycle() {
  int[][] newworld = new int[width/SCALE_FACTOR][height/SCALE_FACTOR];
  for(int i = 0; i < width/SCALE_FACTOR; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < width/SCALE_FACTOR; j++) {
      if (world[i][j] == 1) {
        if (neighbours(i, j) == 3) {
          newworld[i][j] = 1;
        } else {
          newworld[i][j] = 0;
        }
      } else {
        if (neighbours(i, j) == 2 || neighbours(i, j) == 3) {
          newworld[i][j] = 1;
        } else {
          newworld[i][j] = 0;
        }
      }
    }
  }
  for (int i = 0; i < width/SCALE_FACTOR; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < height/SCALE_FACTOR; j++) {
      world[i][j] = newworld[i][j];
    }
  }
}

int neighbours(int x, int y) {
  int px = (x == width/SCALE_FACTOR - 1) ? 0 : (x+1);
  int py = (y == height/SCALE_FACTOR - 1) ? 0 : (y+1);
  int mx = (x == 0) ? (width/SCALE_FACTOR - 1) : (x-1);
  int my = (y == 0) ? (height/SCALE_FACTOR - 1) : (y-1);
  return world[mx][my] + world[mx][y] + world[mx][py]
    + world[x][my] + world[x][py]
    + world[px][my] + world[px][y] + world[px][py];
}
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closed as off topic by Lukas Knuth, nwinkler, towi, Sam I am, Troy Alford Mar 1 '13 at 22:38

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I'd say this is better suited for codereview.stackexchange.com –  Lukas Knuth Feb 28 '13 at 19:20
1  
General strategy: unit test each piece of it. It looks like your branches of the if-statement are backward when looking at if a current cell is alive/dead or not. That is, a dead cell should become alive with three neighbours, and a live cell should stay alive with 2/3 neighbours. –  bchurchill Feb 28 '13 at 19:21
    
Will keep it in mind, first time coming here, thanks Andrew –  Massimiliano Poggi Feb 28 '13 at 19:28
    
Separate the problematic code and ask again. –  towi Mar 1 '13 at 22:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well this looks wrong to start with:

for (int j = 0; j < width/SCALE_FACTOR; j++) {

Surely that should be height.

Next up: currently your logic says, "If the square was alive before, it's only alive in the next round if it's got three neighbours; if it was dead before, it's alive in the next round if it's got two or three neighbours." That's the wrong way round. It takes three live neighbours to create life, but only two or three neighbours to sustain life.

That's all I can immediately see that's wrong with it, but tips on diagnosing the problem:

  • I'd strongly suggest keeping width and height in game terms rather than pixel sizes, which I assume is what SCALE_FACTOR is meant to be. Scale the units up when drawing, but keep all your logic in terms of the actual grid elements.
  • If you isolate the UI from the "business logic" you can easily unit test it.
  • When you're using a UI to display the board, you might want to give it a "manual advance" mode so you can see exactly what's going on more easily.
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Oh that was definitely it, I got the logic wrong from the actual game. Thanks for the useful suggestions though, will keep them in mind! –  Massimiliano Poggi Feb 28 '13 at 19:25

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