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What is the most readable (and idiomatic) to write this method?

private bool BytesAreValid(byte[] bytes) {
    var t = (bytes[0] | bytes[1] | bytes[2]);
    return t != 0;
}

I need a function which tests the first three bytes of a file that it's not begin with 00 00 00.

Haven't done much byte manipulation. The code above doesn't seem correct to me, since t is inferred of type Int32.

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1  
Would you mind to replace "best way" in the post with one of "most readable"/"most compact code"/"fastest code" or any other well defined "better" criteria? (Consider removing tags from title while you are at it). –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 28 '13 at 19:44
    
+1 - good ideas –  BuddyJoe Feb 28 '13 at 19:47
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

t is type-inferred to be an Int32

Yup, because the | operator (like most operators) isn't defined for byte - the bytes are promoted to int values. (See section 7.11.1 of the C# 4 spec for details.)

But given that you only want to compare it with 0, that's fine anyway.

Personally I'd just write it as:

return bytes[0] != 0 && bytes[1] != 0 && bytes[2] != 0;

Or even:

return (bytes[0] != 0) && (bytes[1] != 0) && (bytes[2] != 0);

Both of these seem clearer to me.

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Knew there was a better way to clean that up. Thanks. +1 and answer. –  BuddyJoe Feb 28 '13 at 19:37
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private bool BytesAreValid(byte[] bytes) {
    return !bytes.Take(3).SequenceEqual(new byte[] { 0, 0, 0 });
}
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2  
Or similar 'bytes.Take(3).Any(b => b!=0);' –  erikH Feb 28 '13 at 22:16
    
Better. Thank you! –  Ken Kin Feb 28 '13 at 23:17
    
Awesome technique. +1 –  BuddyJoe Feb 28 '13 at 23:27
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To anticipate variable array lengths and avoid null reference exceptions:

private bool BytesAreValid(byte[] bytes)
{
    if (bytes == null) return false;

    return !Array.Exists(bytes, x => x == 0);
}

Non-Linq version:

private bool BytesAreValid(byte[] bytes)
{
    if (bytes == null) return false;

    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
    {
        if (bytes[i] == 0) return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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So that return false if any 0 exists? –  Ken Kin Feb 28 '13 at 20:01
    
Yes, it returns false (not valid) if the array contains a value that equals zero or if the array is null. –  Tim Feb 28 '13 at 20:11
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