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If have this code (taken from http://stackoverflow.com/a/4859279/1178781):

import java.util.Comparator;

public class ArrayIndexComparator<T extends Comparable<? super T>> implements
        Comparator<Integer> {
    private final T[] array;

    public ArrayIndexComparator(T[] array) {
        this.array = array;
    }

    public Integer[] createIndexArray() {
        Integer[] indexes = new Integer[array.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            indexes[i] = i; // Autoboxing
        }
        return indexes;
    }

    @Override
    public int compare(Integer index1, Integer index2) {
        // Autounbox from Integer to int to use as array indexes
        return array[index1].compareTo(array[index2]);
    }
}

When I run the program this happens:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Comparator;

public class Launcher {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] countries = { "A", "H", "E", "C", "D", "F", "G", "B" };
        ArrayIndexComparator<String> comparator = new ArrayIndexComparator<String>(
                countries);
        Integer[] indexes = comparator.createIndexArray();
        Arrays.sort(indexes, comparator);
        System.out.print("Array:    ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(countries));
        System.out.print("Rankings: ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
        System.out.println("");

        final Float[] scores2 = { 2.3f, 0.7f, 1.4f, 1.2f };
        ArrayIndexComparator<Float> comparator2 = new ArrayIndexComparator<Float>(
                scores2);
        indexes = comparator2.createIndexArray();
        Arrays.sort(indexes, comparator2);
        System.out.print("Array:    ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(scores2));
        System.out.print("Rankings: ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
        System.out.println("");

        final Integer[] scores3 = { 1, 2, 0, 3 };
        ArrayIndexComparator<Integer> comparator3 = new ArrayIndexComparator<Integer>(
                scores3);
        indexes = comparator3.createIndexArray();
        Arrays.sort(indexes, comparator3);
        System.out.print("Array:    ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(scores3));
        System.out.print("Rankings: ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
        System.out.println("");

        final Integer[] scores4 = { 1, 0, 2, 3 };
        ArrayIndexComparator<Integer> comparator4 = new ArrayIndexComparator<Integer>(
                scores4);
        indexes = comparator4.createIndexArray();
        Arrays.sort(indexes, comparator4);
        System.out.print("Array:    ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(scores4));
        System.out.print("Rankings: ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
        System.out.println("");

    }

}

The output is as follows:

Array:    [A, H, E, C, D, F, G, B]
Rankings: [0, 7, 3, 4, 2, 5, 6, 1]

Array:    [2.3, 0.7, 1.4, 1.2]
Rankings: [1, 3, 2, 0]

Array:    [1, 2, 0, 3]
Rankings: [2, 0, 1, 3]

Array:    [1, 0, 2, 3]
Rankings: [1, 0, 2, 3]

I thought that this should correctly give the Rankings of the objects in the array, but certain configurations do not do that. Am I missing something? Or is this not actually sorting to give Rankings, but something else?

For example:

Array:    [A, H, E, C, D, F, G, B]
Rankings: [0, 7, 3, 4, 2, 5, 6, 1]
Should be:[0, 7, 4, 2, 3, 5, 6, 1]

Array:    [2.3, 0.7, 1.4, 1.2]
Rankings: [1, 3, 2, 0]
Should be:[3, 0, 2, 1]

Array:    [1, 2, 0, 3]
Rankings: [2, 0, 1, 3]
Should be:[1, 2, 0, 3]    

Array:    [1, 0, 2, 3]
Rankings: [1, 0, 2, 3]
Should be:[1, 0, 2, 3]
share|improve this question
    
Could your array have duplicates? –  nattyddubbs Feb 28 '13 at 21:15
    
no it doesn't need to consider duplicates –  justderb Feb 28 '13 at 23:13
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1 Answer

Based on the fact that you don't need to consider duplicates you can change everything around to look like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String[] countries = { "A", "H", "E", "C", "D", "F", "G", "B" };
    ArrayComparator<String> comparator = new ArrayComparator<String>(
            countries);
    Integer[] indexes = comparator.createIndexArray();
    System.out.print("Array:     ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(countries));
    System.out.print("Rankings: ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
    System.out.println("");

    final Float[] scores2 = { 2.3f, 0.7f, 1.4f, 1.2f };
    ArrayComparator<Float> comparator2 = new ArrayComparator<Float>(
            scores2);
    indexes = comparator2.createIndexArray();
    System.out.print("Array:     ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(scores2));
    System.out.print("Rankings: ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
    System.out.println("");

    final Integer[] scores3 = { 1, 2, 0, 3 };
    ArrayComparator<Integer> comparator3 = new ArrayComparator<Integer>(
            scores3);
    indexes = comparator3.createIndexArray();
    System.out.print("Array:     ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(scores3));
    System.out.print("Rankings: ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
    System.out.println("");

    final Integer[] scores4 = { 1, 0, 2, 3 };
    ArrayComparator<Integer> comparator4 = new ArrayComparator<Integer>(
            scores4);
    indexes = comparator4.createIndexArray();
    System.out.print("Array:     ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(scores4));
    System.out.print("Rankings: ");
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indexes));
    System.out.println("");

}

public class ArrayComparator<T extends Comparable<? super T>>{
    private final T[] array;
    private final SortedMap<T, Integer> sortedArray;

    public ArrayComparator(T[] array){
        this.array = array;
        sortedArray = new TreeMap<T, Integer>();
        for(int i = 0 ; i < array.length ; i ++){
            sortedArray.put(array[i], Integer.valueOf(i));
        }
    }

    public Integer[] createIndexArray(){
        Integer[] indexArray = new Integer[sortedArray.size()];
        int i = 0;
        for(T key : sortedArray.keySet()){
            indexArray[sortedArray.get(key)] = i;
            i++;
        }
        return indexArray;
    }
}

Then run it and your output looks like this:

Array:     [A, H, E, C, D, F, G, B]
Rankings:  [0, 7, 4, 2, 3, 5, 6, 1]

Array:     [2.3, 0.7, 1.4, 1.2]
Rankings:  [3, 0, 2, 1]

Array:     [1, 2, 0, 3]
Rankings:  [1, 2, 0, 3]

Array:     [1, 0, 2, 3]
Rankings:  [1, 0, 2, 3]

Which is what I believe you are looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
The output you gave just sorts the scores, it does not give me the rankings for each score. It already 'sorts' the scores but does so on the int array. –  justderb Feb 28 '13 at 20:14
    
So you are expecting the sorted indexes array to map directly to the "ranking" of the item at the same index in the scores4 array? If so I don't know that's what it's intended for. The original post doesn't reference "ranking" of any kind. –  nattyddubbs Feb 28 '13 at 20:35
    
I've updated my question at the bottom. Hopefully this should help see what I want to do... –  justderb Feb 28 '13 at 20:47
    
It does thank you. –  nattyddubbs Feb 28 '13 at 21:18
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