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I've searched but haven't been able to get what I want...

I'm doing a little game. And I got this struct that contains the player details.

struct Player
{
    string name;
    int level;
    int exp;
    int hp; // life
    int mp; // mana
    int shield;
};

And when in the menu, the user chooses to start a new game, it goes to this function:

    int StartNewPlayer(string name)
    {
        Player player;

        player.name = name;
        player.level = 1;
        player.exp = 0;
        player.hp = 20;
        player.mp = 5;
        player.shield = 0;

        *pass/return the struct here*
    }

Then I have a function that prints the game board, and where I should use the data from the new player struct, for example:

void game_board ()
{
    cout << "Hello!" << player.name;

    (...)
}

Finally, somewhere in main I have:

int main ()
{
    StartNewPlayer(new_game());
    game_board();
}

that calls all the functions above.

But I can't figure it out... I tried references, pointers without luck.. I need some help here please...

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about this?

Player StartNewPlayer(string name)
{
    Player player;

    player.name = name;
    player.level = 1;
    player.exp = 0;
    player.hp = 20;
    player.mp = 5;
    player.shield = 0;

    return player;
}

void game_board(Player player)
{
    cout << "Hello!" << player.name;

    (...)
}

int main ()
{
    Player player = StartNewPlayer(new_game());
    game_board(player);
}
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I get this error compiling error C2360: initialization of 'player' is skipped by 'case' label. Is it because the Player player = StartNewPlayer(new_game()); game_board(player); is in a switch? –  Henrique Ferrolho Feb 28 '13 at 19:59
2  
@HenriqueFerrolho Posting the switch code would be helpful. One solution is to surround the case in braces, like this case 0: { Player player = ...; } break; –  Pubby Feb 28 '13 at 20:01
    
ALRIGHT! :D FINALLY! that did the trick! can you please explain why? I would like to understand... And also, I have a doubt, in this function: Player StartNewPlayer(string name) what does Player mean? is the return type? kind of like int? –  Henrique Ferrolho Feb 28 '13 at 20:04
    
@HenriqueFerrolho The braces are needed because crossing labels screw up initialization. Not something you need to know as a beginner. Yes, the Player is the return type of the function. –  Pubby Feb 28 '13 at 20:09
    
ok thank you so much –  Henrique Ferrolho Feb 28 '13 at 20:11

Do not create extra copies of the data with complex datatypes by using pass-by-value

Use pointers instead to pass the address of the variable that can be modified in the function. The changes will be reflected in the caller's function as well.

void StartNewPlayer(string name, Player *player)
{
    player->name = name;
    player->level = 1;
    player->exp = 0;
    player->hp = 20;
    player->mp = 5;
    player->shield = 0;
}

void game_board(Player* player)
{
    cout << "Hello!" << player->name;

    (...)
}

int main ()
{
    Player player;
    StartNewPlayer(new_game(), &player);
    game_board(&player);
}

Alternative using pass-by-reference:

If you're a fan of references, (which is just a clever compiler-trick that makes use of pointers internally again):

void StartNewPlayer(string name, Player& player)
{
    player.name = name;
    player.level = 1;
    player.exp = 0;
    player.hp = 20;
    player.mp = 5;
    player.shield = 0;
}

void game_board(Player& player)
{
    cout << "Hello!" << player.name;

    (...)
}

int main ()
{
    Player player;
    StartNewPlayer(new_game(), player);
    game_board(player);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the details on avoid copy constructors, -1 for saying that references are just a compiler trick to hide pointers. –  Donnie Feb 28 '13 at 20:35
    
@Donnie - can you explain what you can do using references that you cannot achieve using pointers ? (NOTE: Not the other way around, i.e. I know references has limitations compared to pointers) And if you can prove to me that references generate a different assembly code all together compared to pointers, I will take down my statement. –  Tuxdude Feb 28 '13 at 20:39
    
@Tuxdude Indeed, you can probably do everything with references that you can with pointers, just as you can do everything with C that you can with C++. But C++ has certain error-proofing and legibility advantages, among others. –  Alan Feb 28 '13 at 20:50
    
@Tuxdude Similarly, references have advantages over pointers in certain situations in terms of making the code more error-proof and easier to read. A reference must be initialized in such a way that it refers to a variable, while a pointer can be set to any value at all. If in a certain situation you want to guarantee that a variable points to something, you can use a reference. Also, references can make the calling code easier to read, since they can make the address operator (&) unnecessary. –  Alan Feb 28 '13 at 20:51
    
@Alan - I agree with everything you said which covers code readability and avoiding the -> operator. But the same advantage you meant has a disadvantage too. For example I cannot directly store the address of an allocation using new() or malloc() into a reference. References are just an indication to the compiler that I'm going to be referring to the same variable using aliases (across functions too). You cannot initialize a reference to a NULL, it always has to be initialized to the variable it refers-to. Where to use pointers vs references is a big debate of its own ;) –  Tuxdude Feb 28 '13 at 20:56

I would suggest returning a pointer to a Player struct. If you return a "reference" like you are doing right now, it will call the copy constructor of Player which can lead to further complications.

Normally, at the end of StartNewPlayer(...), the Player you declared there will cease to exist as the object scope will end, so when you return it, the c++ compiler gets that you want to keep the object alive and will create a copy for you, invisibly. If you return a pointer to it, you really are returning the object you allocated in your function.

Suppose that you have pointers in your Player structure, such as

struct Player
{
  int level;
  char* name; //lets assume you did it like that
}

When you are returning the Player, the int will be copied, but the char* will not. ints are easy to handle while char* need all kind of tricky functions like strlen and strncpy. The more complex your Player struct becomes, the more problem you will face by using the default copy constructor.

Another solution would be to declare a copy constructor yourself for the Player struct ( really, you could use classes since they are mostly interchangeable in c++ ).

Player(const Player& p)
{
    name = p.name;
    level = p.level;
    // and so forth
}

So I would use

Player* StartNewPlayer(std::string name)
{
    Player* player = new Player();
    player->name = name;
    player->level = 1;
    // snip 
    return player;
}

At the end of your program, be sure to delete player otherwise you will have a memory leak

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