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I am running into the following problem: I must map my Employee class to the following database schema (where id1 and id2 is a composite primary key):

--------------------------
| id1 | id2 | ManagerId2 |
--------------------------
| 1   | 1   | NULL       | <--- Have no manager / Can be manager of many   
--------------------------
| 1   | 2   | 1          | <--- Is manager / Has manager 1-1 
--------------------------
| 1   | 3   | 1          | <--- Is manager / Has manager 1-1 
--------------------------

I am aware that a foreign key must have the same columns as the primary key it references (same number of columns). The point is that once an Employee is inserted with id1 = 1 it must only reference managers with id1 = 1. A way to keep integrity and avoid scenarios like the following:

---------------------------------------
| id1 | id2 | ManagerId1 | ManagerId2 |
---------------------------------------
| 1   | 1   | NULL       | NULL       | <--- Have no manager / Can be manager of many   
---------------------------------------
| 2   | 1   | NULL       | NULL       | <--- Have no manager / Can be manager of many   
---------------------------------------
| 1   | 2   | 2          | 1          | <--- THIS IS NOT ALLOWED
---------------------------------------
| 1   | 3   | 2          | 1          | <--- NOR THIS
---------------------------------------

So far the best that I got is the following mapping (although it creates the table as expected it simply doesn't populates the ManagerId2 field):

@Entity
@Table(name="Employee")
public class Employee {

    public Employee(){
    }

    @EmbeddedId
    private EmployeeId id;
    public void setId(EmployeeId id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
    public EmployeeId getId() {
        return id;
    }

    @ManyToOne(cascade={CascadeType.ALL})
    @JoinColumns({ 
        @JoinColumn(name = "id1", referencedColumnName = "id1", insertable=false, updatable=false), //its fine to have this attribute not insertable nor updatable
        @JoinColumn(name = "id2_manager", referencedColumnName = "id2", insertable=false, updatable=false) //but I must be able to update this one!
    })
    private Employee manager;
    public Employee getManager() {
        return manager;
    }
        public void setManager(Employee manager) {
        this.manager = manager;
    }
}

@Embeddable
public class EmployeeId implements Serializable{

    public EmployeeId() {

    }

    public EmployeeId(int id1, int id2) {
        this.id1 = id1;
        this.id2 = id2;
    }

    private int id1;

    private int id2;

    public int getId1() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(int id1) {
        this.id1 = id1;
    }

    public int getId2() {
        return id2;
    }

    public void setId2(int id2) {
        this.id2 = id2;
    }

            //hashCode and equals properly overriden
}

After goggling the entire day it seems that I am not able to find anything! Can someone kindly show me what I am doing wrong, or point to any good resources?

PS.: I can't change the db schema, it is not an option

share|improve this question
    
Does your table have a ManagerId1 column or not? –  Aaron Kurtzhals Feb 28 '13 at 20:49
    
No it doesn't. I mean, it must not be present as the schema is mandatory and the schemahave only id1, id1 and managerId2 in it –  renatoargh Feb 28 '13 at 20:51
    
Why do you say "It doesn't populate the ManagerId1 field?" Is that a typo? –  Aaron Kurtzhals Feb 28 '13 at 21:04
    
OH YES, sorry! Editing it now!!! –  renatoargh Feb 28 '13 at 21:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Im not sure how to do this with annotations, but ive found a workaround that might help you.

@Entity
@Table(name = "Employee")
public class Employee {

    @EmbeddedId
    private EmployeeId id;

    private Integer id2_manager;

    @PrePersist
    @PreUpdate
    public void prePersistUpdate() {
        if (manager != null)
            id2_manager = manager.getId().getId2();
    }

    public Employee() {
    }

    public void setId(EmployeeId id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public EmployeeId getId() {
        return id;
    }

    @ManyToOne(cascade = { CascadeType.ALL })
    @JoinColumns({ @JoinColumn(name = "id1", referencedColumnName = "id1", insertable = false, updatable = false),
            @JoinColumn(name = "id2_manager", referencedColumnName = "id2", insertable = false, updatable = false, nullable = true) })
    private Employee manager;

    public Employee getManager() {
        return manager;
    }

    public void setManager(Employee manager) {
        this.manager = manager;
    }
}

to test

    static EntityManagerFactory emf;
    static EntityManager em;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        emf = Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("unit");
        em = emf.createEntityManager();

        Employee manager = new Employee();
        manager.setId(new EmployeeId(1, 1));

        Employee e1 = new Employee();
        e1.setId(new EmployeeId(1,2));
        e1.setManager(manager);


        em.getTransaction().begin();

        em.persist(manager);
        em.persist(e1);

        em.getTransaction().commit();

        Employee e2 = em.find(Employee.class, new EmployeeId(1, 2));

        System.out.println(e2.getManager().getId().getId1() + "-" + e2.getManager().getId().getId2());
        //  prints  1-1

    }
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