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Folks, i'm looking for a standard EULA form to include with my freeware project. I'm just looking for clauses to "cover my butt": not responsible for any losses, etc.

Is there a standard, boilerplate template that I can get from somewhere? Googling didn't help..

NOTE: I'm not releasing the source code of the software with the project. It's a closed-source project.

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Duplicate question... see stackoverflow.com/questions/89043/… –  saschabeaumont Nov 14 '08 at 1:59
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5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This is a standard feature in most licenses. A few samples from various Free- and Open-Source licenses:

GNU GPL v3:

THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION.

Apache 2

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, Licensor provides the Work (and each Contributor provides its Contributions) on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied, including, without limitation, any warranties or conditions of TITLE, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY, or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. You are solely responsible for determining the appropriateness of using or redistributing the Work and assume any risks associated with Your exercise of permissions under this License.

Zlib:

This software is provided 'as-is', without any express or implied
warranty. In no event will the authors be held liable for any damages arising from the use of this software.

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Note that if the project is closed source, only copy what you need from the license such as the disclaimer and make sure you edit it to fit your needs. –  saschabeaumont Nov 14 '08 at 1:55
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All these licences suggested already are for open source projects.

Just do a search on google for standard software disclamer and grab what you like. This one seems pretty cool: example

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Maybe a stupid question, but aren't the eulas of other companies copyrighted by them? Is it really possible to cut and paste at will? –  FeatureCreep Jul 17 '10 at 18:33
    
@FeatureCreep : That's not uniformly decided, AFAICT. The first consideration is whether a license text would even be subject to copyright law. The second consideration is whether they are creative works, or dictated by external constraints. Copyright is generally limited to creative works. One quick (but imperfect) way to figure this out is to check whether the copyright law explicitly excludes laws from copyright. If it does, then legal texts in general are subject to copyright (else there would be no need for such exceptions). –  MSalters Sep 20 '10 at 7:20
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There are a number of "freeware" licenses. Among them

  • Apache License 2.0
  • Common Development & Distribution License
  • GNU Public License
  • Microsoft Public License
  • Mozilla Public License
  • BSD License
  • MIT License

Each has it's own unique set of critera, for both you and whoever is using your software, so look at them all, or possibly roll out your own.

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Those are licesnses for open-source, not freeware. –  John Millikin Sep 30 '08 at 2:00
    
If the project is closed source, just extract the relevant disclaimers and copy the legalese. Not too hard.. –  saschabeaumont Nov 14 '08 at 1:54
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Check out the MIT License.

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That is open source. The OP wants closed source. –  Annonomus Penguin Jul 17 '13 at 16:04
    
@Aurelius I somehow doubt the MIT License will change any time soon. Also, republishing the license in the answer seems rather... useless. –  Franci Penov Jul 17 '13 at 18:37
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I have made my own app, install this first, after install, run and choose the EULA Maker download here

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