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What is the most concise and bytecode efficient way to access a scalar expression multiple times from deep within another expression?

All of the functions in the following code (exc. scalar4) function as desired. But only bytecoder emits efficient bytecode (although it ends badly with ISTORE 2 ILOAD 2), the others each generate a half dozen INVOKE's.

This idiom is also handy for passing arbitrary parts of a tuple as parameters:

for (a_tuple) { f(_._3, _._1) + g(_._2) }  // caution NOT legal Scala

In this example intro represents an expensive function that should only be called once.

object Hack extends App
{
  @inline final def fur[T, V](x :T)(f :T => V) :V = f(x)

  @inline final def pfor[T, V](x :T)(pf :PartialFunction[T, V]) = pf(x)

  @inline final def cfor[T, V](x :T)(f :T => V) :V = x match { case x => f(x) }

  def intro :Int = 600 // only one chance to make a first impression

  def bytecoder = intro match { case __ => __ + __ / 600 }

  def functional = fur(intro) (x => x + x / 600)

  def partial = pfor(intro) { case __ => __ + __ / 600 }

  def cased = cfor(intro) ($ => $ + $ / 600)

  def optional = Some(intro).map(? => ? + ? / 600).get

  def folder = Some(intro).fold(0)(? => ? + ? / 600)

  // the for I wish for
  def scalar4 = for(intro) (_ + _ / 600) // single underline!

  println(bytecoder, functional, partial, cased, optional, folder)
}

public bytecoder()I

ALOAD 0
INVOKEVIRTUAL com/_601/hack/Hack$.intro ()I
ISTORE 1
ILOAD 1
ILOAD 1
SIPUSH 600
IDIV
IADD
ISTORE 2
ILOAD 2
IRETURN
share|improve this question
    
def tempvar = { var x = intro; x + x / 600 }? You can put a block anywhere, you know. – Rex Kerr Feb 28 '13 at 21:01
1  
If you're looking for "bytecode efficiency" in Scala, you're in the wrong place. – Antimony Feb 28 '13 at 21:08
    
Isn't the JIT able to optimize the final useless ISTORE 2 / ILOAD 2? – Bruno Reis Feb 28 '13 at 21:36
    
@BrunoReis - Certainly, but as it's such a simple optimization I was surprised scalac didn't do it. – 601 Feb 28 '13 at 22:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just create a local block with a temporary val. Seriously. It's compact: just one character longer than "idiomatic" pipe

{ val x = whatever; x * x / 600 }
whatever match { case x => x * x / 600 }
whatever |> { x => x * x / 600 }

It's efficient: minimum bytecode possible.

// def localval = { val x = whatever; x * x / 600 }
public int localval();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokevirtual   #18; //Method whatever:()I
   4:   istore_1
   5:   iload_1
   6:   iload_1
   7:   imul
   8:   sipush  600
   11:  idiv
   12:  ireturn

The only thing it doesn't do is act as a postfix operator, and you have match for that when you really need that form and can't tolerate extra bytecode.

share|improve this answer
    
Accepting because it's bytecode efficient and simple. But I still don't like the semicolon and having to name the anonymous val. Thanks for your attention to this question. – 601 Mar 12 '13 at 10:07
// Canadian scalar "for" expression
@inline final case class four[T](x: T)
{
  @inline def apply(): T = x

  @inline def apply[V](f: Function1[T,          V]): V = f(x)
  @inline def apply[V](f: Function2[T, T,       V]): V = { val $ = x; f($, $) }
  @inline def apply[V](f: Function3[T, T, T,    V]): V = { val $ = x; f($, $, $) }
  @inline def apply[V](f: Function4[T, T, T, T, V]): V = { val $ = x; f($, $, $, $) }
  // ...
}

// Usage
val x = System.currentTimeMillis.toInt % 1 + 600

def a = four(x)() + 1
def b = four(x)(_ + 1)
def c = four(x)(_ + _ / x)
def d = four(x)(_ + _ / _)
def e = four(x)(_ + _ / _ - _) + 600

println(a, b, c, d, e)

With this four(){}, bytecode and performance is sacrificed in favour of style.

Also, this dangerously breaks from tradition, that underlines are used only once per parameter.

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