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I'm having trouble with the following code, where Xcode is flagging a memory problem. The warnings are below the code, on the return line. Does anybody know why, and what I can do about it?

- (id)copyWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    NSData *archivedData = [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject:self];
    return [NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:archivedData];
}

Mvariable.m:177:2: Object with a +0 retain count returned to caller where a +1 (owning) retain count is expected
Mvariable.m:177:9: Method returns an Objective-C object with a +0 retain count
Mvariable.m:177:2: Object returned to caller with a +0 retain count
Mvariable.m:177:2: Object with a +0 retain count returned to caller where a +1 (owning) retain count is expected

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

methods that start with "copy", "create", "new", "alloc", or "retain", must return an object that has been retained, ie, the caller must release it.

[NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:archivedData] returns an autorelased object.

see: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/MemoryMgmt/Articles/mmRules.html

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3  
Note that using archiving to copy an object is definitely not typical. It is also quite slow compared to the normal means of doing so. –  bbum Feb 28 '13 at 21:00
    
Oh wow, I didn't realise the start of a method name alone could do this, how odd. Thanks for the answer! –  loco Feb 28 '13 at 21:06
    
in the old days it was just a convention and there wasn't ARC, or markers to __strong and __weak or the syntactic sweetness of (__attribute__((ns_returns_autoreleased)))... so we had to keep track of things somehow... –  Grady Player Feb 28 '13 at 22:02

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