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I'm trying to optimize the following SQL but my knowledge of SQL optimization is rather green and I'm not making much headway.(I generalized the columns and other identifiers due to company policy) In its current state, this SQL takes anywhere between 1 to 2 minutes to run depending on load. The VKTINFO table contains about 1 million records and the GNTINFO table contains about 3 million records. Normally the 1-2 minutes wouldn't be a big deal if this was a batch process, but we have agents needing this information live and as quickly as possible - to make matters worse, our system times out eventually and returns a sorry error to the user. It is not an option to extend the timeout windows however. We have other criteria to search against e.g. First name, zip code, account type, account status, etcetera but when a broad search such below is performed, the query becomes rather slow.

If there are any suggestions/techniques on how this SQL might be able to be manipulated to speed up the select, I would greatly appreciate any thoughts on the matter. If more information is needed, I would be glad to provide as much as I can that still complies with our company policy.

edit: As requested here are the indexes for the VKTINFO and GNTINFO tables.

  • account_number
  • expiration_date
  • effective_date

Indexes for the gnt_account_info and vkt_account_info:

  • pi_account_num
  • pi_policy_num_gid

Indexes for the gntnad and vktnad tables:

  • nad_account_number
  • nad_name_type

Index for the gntpolrf and vktpolrf tables:

  • xrf_account_number
select
processing_system,
total_premium,
quote_by,
email_address,
account_number,
expiration_date,
account_state,
xrf_file,
customer_name
from
(
   select
   'ABCD' as processing_system,
   total_premium,
   quote_by,
   email_address,
   account_number,
   expiration_date,
   account_state,
   xrf_file,
   customer_name
   from vktinfo 
    left outer join vkt_account_info on account_number = pi_account_number 
    left outer join vktpolrf on account_number = xrf_account_number 
    left outer join VKTNAD on account_number = nad_account_number
    and history_expiration_date=nad_history_expiration_date
    and nad_name_type='HA'
   WHERE effective_date >= '2013-02-01'
   AND effective_date <= '2013-02-28'
   AND customer_name like '_SMITH%'
   AND account_state = 'South Carolina'
   union all
   select
   'EFGH' as processing_system,
   total_premium,
   quote_by,
   email_address,
   account_number,
   expiration_date,
   account_state,
   xrf_file,
   customer_name
   from gntinfo 
    left outer join gnt_account_info on account_number = pi_account_number 
    left outer join vktpolrf on account_number = xrf_account_number 
    left outer join GNTNAD on account_number = nad_account_number
    and history_expiration_date=nad_history_expiration_date
    and nad_name_type='HA'
   WHERE effective_date >= '2013-02-01'
   AND effective_date <= '2013-02-28'
   AND customer_name like '_SMITH%'
   AND account_state = 'South Carolina'
)
a
order by customer_name ASC fetch first 1000 rows only WITH UR
share|improve this question
3  
Please post (add to the question) what indexes you have. –  PM 77-1 Feb 28 '13 at 21:28
3  
Can you paste the execution plan into your question? The WHERE clauses in the unioned SELECT statements are identical; it's worth testing whether the optimizer will make better decisions by cutting the two WHERE clauses from the subquery, and pasting one of them into the outer query. But first look at the execution plan. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Feb 28 '13 at 21:42
2  
What tables are "effective_date" and "nad_name_type" in? Those tables might be able to use an inner join instead of a left join. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Feb 28 '13 at 21:44
1  
Agree with Mike, for clarity of anyone after you, or those you are trying to get help from, when doing any joins to other tables, you should ALWAYS refer to the columns as table.field so others can help, such as this scenario. Having compound index on table associated with respective columns as part of the JOIN would be optimized better. –  DRapp Feb 28 '13 at 22:29
1  
"order by customer_name" will take O(n log(n)) time if you don't have an index on this column (where n is the size of the result set before applying "first 1000", this might not be a problem, depending on the size of the result set, of course...) –  Rolf Rander Feb 28 '13 at 22:49
show 6 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't have a rock-solid answer for you. But I do have some things you can try. I understand you don't have permissions to get an execution plan.

  • Check with someone who's been there a while, and ask whether you're supposed to be able to run EXPLAIN.
  • You probably need an index on account_state. Rule of thumb: index every column used in a join condition or a WHERE clause. Sometimes multi-column indexes perform better than several single-column indexes.
  • Try moving every part of the subquery's WHERE clauses that you can move to the outer query, and test two things.
    • Use those parts in an ordinary WHERE clause in the outer query.
    • Rerrange the outer query so that, instead of selecting from the UNIONed subquery, you do an inner join on it.
  • Determine whether any of the left outer joins can be replaced by inner joins. The table that stores "nad_name_type" is a likely candidate for an inner join. (Do you understand why?)
  • Test the performance of the subquery when it's implemented as a view. You might need DBA help with that. (If they don't let you run EXPLAIN, they probably don't let you create views, either.)
  • Test the performance of the subquery when it's implemented as a materialized query table. You might need DBA help with that, too.
share|improve this answer
    
Mike, thank you for your advice. I dug further into the issue this morning per your bullet points and noticed a peculiarity. We have two columns that reference the USA state - the account_state which you recommended we put an index on and another column representing the customers home address state. The home address state had an index where as the account_state did not (despite being used in our SQL). As a proof of concept, I swapped in the indexed state column to search against in place of nonindexed - 160 seconds reduced to 1.5 seconds. I will look into getting DBAs to create an index. –  Jason B-H Mar 1 '13 at 16:50
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