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Say I have a method like this:

IEnumerable<record> GetSomeRecords()
{
  while(...)
  {
    yield return aRecord
  }
}

Now, lets say I have a caller that also returns an enumerable of the same type, something like this

IEnumerable<record> ParentGetSomeRecords()
{
  // I want to do this, but for some reason, my brain locks right here
  foreach(item in someItems)
    yield return GetSomeRecords();
}

That code gets syntax error error because yield return wants a type record, and I'm returning an IEnumerable of records

I want one "flat" IEnumerable that flattens a nested loop of enumerables. It's making me crazy, becuase I know I've done this before, but I can't seem to remember what it was. got any hints?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure what you mean by "one flat IEnumerable" in this case - could you show an example of the expected return type/data? –  Felipe Castro Feb 28 '13 at 21:55
    
Do you have to use yield return? –  mattytommo Feb 28 '13 at 21:55
    
If you just want to return the data as a materialized list (without any data transformation), you could use GetSomeRecords().ToList(). Is that what you want? –  Felipe Castro Feb 28 '13 at 21:56
    
@JMarsch: The relation between GetSomeRecords() and ParentGetSomeRecords() is not clear; you should describe how they are related. Is ParentGetSomeRecords() returning some kind of tree? Is Record a self-referencing type? –  rsenna Feb 28 '13 at 22:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Is this what you are after?

IEnumerable<record> ParentGetSomeRecords()
{
    foreach(var item in someItems)
        foreach(var record in GetSomeRecords())
            yield return record;
}

As noted, this will only work for a single level of children but is the most equivalent of your example code.

Update

Some people seem to believe you want the ability to flatten a hierarchical structure. Here is an extension method which performs breadth-first flattening (get the siblings before children):

Coming from a single item:

[Pure]
public static IEnumerable<T> BreadthFirstFlatten<T>(this T source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> selector)
{
    Contract.Requires(!ReferenceEquals(source, null));
    Contract.Requires(selector != null);
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<IEnumerable<T>>() != null);

    var pendingChildren = new List<T> {source};

    while (pendingChildren.Any())
    {
        var localPending = pendingChildren.ToList();
        pendingChildren.Clear();
        foreach (var child in localPending)
        {
            yield return child;
            var results = selector(child);
            if (results != null)
                pendingChildren.AddRange(results);
        }
    }
}

This can be used like so:

record rec = ...;
IEnumerable<record> flattened = rec.BreadthFirstFlatten(r => r.ChildRecords);

This will result in an IEnumerable<record> containing rec, all of recs children, all of the childrens children, etc etc..

If you are coming from a collection of records, use the following code:

[Pure]
private static IEnumerable<T> BreadthFirstFlatten<T, TResult>(IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, TResult> selector, Action<ICollection<T>, TResult> addMethod)
{
    Contract.Requires(source != null);
    Contract.Requires(selector != null);
    Contract.Requires(addMethod != null);
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<IEnumerable<T>>() != null);

    var pendingChildren = new List<T>(source);

    while (pendingChildren.Any())
    {
        var localPending = pendingChildren.ToList();
        pendingChildren.Clear();
        foreach (var child in localPending)
        {
            yield return child;
            var results = selector(child);
            if (!ReferenceEquals(results, null))
                addMethod(pendingChildren, results);
        }
    }
}

[Pure]
public static IEnumerable<T> BreadthFirstFlatten<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> selector)
{
    Contract.Requires(source != null);
    Contract.Requires(selector != null);
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<IEnumerable<T>>() != null);

    return BreadthFirstFlatten(source, selector, (collection, arg2) => collection.AddRange(arg2));
}

[Pure]
public static IEnumerable<T> BreadthFirstFlatten<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T> selector)
{
    Contract.Requires(source != null);
    Contract.Requires(selector != null);
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<IEnumerable<T>>() != null);

    return BreadthFirstFlatten(source, selector, (collection, arg2) => collection.Add(arg2));
}

These two extension methods can be used like so:

IEnumerable<records> records = ...;
IEnumerable<record> flattened = records.BreadthFirstFlatten(r => r.ChildRecords);

Or from the reverse direction:

IEnumerable<record> records = ...;
IEnumerable<record> flattened = records.BreadthFirstFlatten(r => r.ParentRecords);

All of these extension methods are iterative so not limited by the stack size.

I have a whole host of these types of methods, including pre-order and post-order depth-first traversal, if you wish to see them, I will make a repo and upload them somewhere :)

share|improve this answer
    
Probably is what he's looking for. +1 –  It'sNotALie. Feb 28 '13 at 21:58
1  
I think his record class has a IEnumerable<record> so it could be n levels deep. This only works for the first level –  mattytommo Feb 28 '13 at 22:00
    
@mattytommo I will post an update to my answer in case that is what he is after. –  Lukazoid Feb 28 '13 at 22:05
    
You can "unroll" recursive sequences using an extension of this approach btw. –  Matthew Watson Feb 28 '13 at 22:15
    
@MatthewWatson Almost what I posted, except my updated code is iterative, no stackoverflows for me ^^ –  Lukazoid Feb 28 '13 at 22:16

How about:

IEnumerable<record> ParentGetSomeRecords()
{
    var nestedEnumerable = <whatever the heck gets your nested set>;
    // SelectMany with an identity flattens 
    // IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> to just IEnumerable<T>
    return nestedEnumerable.SelectMany(rec => rec);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think he has a never ending chain of sub-items. This only works on first level sub items. –  mattytommo Feb 28 '13 at 21:57
    
@mattytommo Yeah, had to re-read that a couple times...edited with explanatory comment –  JerKimball Feb 28 '13 at 21:59

Inefficient, but you could use this:

List<Record> rcrdList = new List<Record>();
foreach (var item in someItems)
{
    rcrdList.AddRange(item.GetSomeRecords());
}
return rcrdList;
share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter, WHY? –  It'sNotALie. Mar 1 '13 at 7:50

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