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I may be trying to do something here that may not possible. Is it possible to inject some logic into the SingleOrDefault enumerable method on the expression I'm building.

The deal is I would have (2) identical query results, other than the parameter used to pull the results.

Deal is the ID and ID2 values don't both exist in all conditions. I'm trying to create a single expression that will narrow the results based on a condition. Here is what I'm trying to accomplish:

//'ID' and 'ID2' sre parameters passed into method
var query = Repository.GetQuery<Person>()
                      .Include(x => x.PersonDetail)
                      .SingleOrDefault(
                                       if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ID))
                                       {
                                         x => x.PersonDetail.ID2 == ID2;
                                       }
                                       else
                                       {
                                         x => x.PersonDetail.ID == ID;
                                       }
                                       );

Right now it will not build and produces the following error:

Cannot resolve symbol PersonDetail

Ok, so I may have completely construed the implementation, but essentially can I do something like I attempted above, or do I have to write (2) separate queries that are pulling the same data, and keep the 'deciding logic' external to the expression?

Any help is appreciated, thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your branch condition is known, so you can (and should) pull the branch out of the lambda:

var query = Repository.GetQuery<Person>()
                      .Include(x => x.PersonDetail);

if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ID))
{
    query = query.Where(x => x.PersonDetail.ID2 == ID2);
}
else
{
    query = query.Where(x => x.PersonDetail.ID == ID);
}

var result = query.SingleOrDefault();

There are also many other ways to write this, but the important part is that you don't need to involve the ID check with the lambda at all.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for readability –  Jens Kloster Feb 28 '13 at 22:11
    
Yes in the world of lambdas and being concise, sometimes we need to step back and allow for verbosity that equates to better readability. Thanks for showing another approach to this. –  atconway Feb 28 '13 at 22:29
    
@atconway please remember to mark this answer correct if it helped you with the question posted. –  Jesse Mar 1 '13 at 2:21
1  
@atconway hey, no problem! I hadn't noticed your high rep. I've been reviewing a lot of posts/answers from new users lately. It begins to catch on... –  Jesse Mar 1 '13 at 14:59
1  
@atconway: That's a very good point which I didn't call attention to because "it's obviously composable" -- turns out, obviously only applies if you have enough LINQ experience. Noted, and will remember to bring this up in future similar situations. Thank you very much for the feedback! –  Jon Mar 1 '13 at 16:48

This is what you want:

var query = Repository.GetQuery<Person>()
                  .Include(x => x.PersonDetail)
                  .SingleOrDefault(String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ID) ?
                          x => x.PersonDetail.ID2 == ID2 :
                          x => x.PersonDetail.ID == ID);

Albeit, not easily readable, but it accomplishes what you want in a one-liner.

EDIT Fixed syntax error.

share|improve this answer
    
Even if you wanted an one-liner, it would still be much better to pull the condition as far out as possible: .SingleOrDefault(String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ID) ? (x => x.PersonDetail.ID2 == ID2) : (x.PersonDetail.ID == ID)). There's no need for the filter to be checking if ID is null for every data item, its value is not going to change. –  Jon Feb 28 '13 at 22:15
    
"Shorter" is not by itself a good quality. "Shorter" is usually nice because it makes it easier to read. You already mention that in your case, it does not have that benefit, and for that reason you should probably forget about it. You also have a syntax error, by the way, and if you resolve that, you probably have another problem, but what that other problem is depends on how you resolve the syntax error. –  hvd Feb 28 '13 at 22:15
    
@Jon the code you suggested won't work; at least not on my test project. –  Jesse Feb 28 '13 at 22:21
    
@hvd thanks for catching that! I tripped over my own feet trimming the answer before posting. –  Jesse Feb 28 '13 at 22:21
    
@Jesse: What code exactly? –  Jon Feb 28 '13 at 22:24

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