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I am currently learning / using c++, but I come from a Java background, so I apologize if this is a silly question. Below is some code representing the way I am handling errors generated by an external API. However, I am uncertain whether it would cause a memory leak when I assign a value to my error handling output parameter.

class ExceptionHandler {

private:
    std::string _msg;
    int _code;

public:
    ExceptionHandler(std::string msg = "", int code = 0) : 
         _msg(msg),
         _code(code)
    {
    }

    int code() {
        return _code;
    }
    std::string msg() {
        return _msg;
    }

}

 //This method returns true if it was executed with no errors
 //It returns false if an error occurred

    bool foo(ExceptionHandler * errHandler = NULL) {

        int sts; 

        //The API functions return 0 if completed successfully
        //else they returns some error code

        sts = some_api_func1();

        if(sts != 0) { //An error occurred!
            if(errHandler) {
                ExceptionHandler handler("Error from func1",sts);
                *errHandler = handler; //<--- Will this cause a memory leak since I would be losing errHandler's original value??
            }
            return false;
        }

        //My motivation for using exception handling this way is that I can 
        //set the handler's message based on what part it failed at and the 
        //code associated with it, like below:

        sts = some_api_func2();

        if(sts != 0) { //An error occurred!
            if(errHandler) {
                ExceptionHandler handler("Error from func2",sts); //<--- Different err message
                *errHandler = handler; //<--- But does this cause a memory leak?
            }
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }


//Main method

int main() {
    ExceptionHandler handler;

    if(!foo(&handler)) {

        std::cout << "An exception occurred: (" << handler.code() << ") " << handler.msg() << std::endl;

    } else {

        std::cout << "Success!" << std::endl;

    }


}
  • Would the method 'foo()' cause a memory leak if an error occurred?

  • If so, how can I fix it? If not, how come it doesn't?

  • Is this a good way of handling errors?

Thank you in advance!

EDIT

I've learned that the above code would not generate a memory leak, but that the following code is a better way of handling errors (Thank you everyone!):

void foo() {

    int sts;

    sts = some_api_func1();


    if(sts != 0) 
        throw ExceptionHandler("Error at func1",sts);

    sts = some_api_func2();

    if(sts != 0)
        throw ExceptionHandler("Error at func2",sts);
}

int main() {

    try {
        foo();
        std::cout << "Success!";
    } catch(ExceptionHandler &e) { //<--- Catch by reference
        std::cout << "Exception: (" << e.code() << ") " << e.msg();
    }


}
share|improve this question
5  
Worse, handler is declared on the stack. As soon as your function returns, that memory is no longer valid and "bad" things will happen. Not a memory leak, but a segfault waiting to happen. –  Michael Dorgan Feb 28 '13 at 22:14
5  
You are aware that C++ has an exception mechanisms already, right? You can just throw an error. –  andre Feb 28 '13 at 22:16
1  
"this way is that I can set the handler's message based on what part it failed at and the code associated with it" - there are much more convenient ways of achieving the same. Simple throwing of an exception would be sufficient here... there are ways how to even get a stack trace out of it so that you can see exactly the whole path that exception was "going" through... –  LihO Feb 28 '13 at 22:18
4  
The short answer to the question is you did not use the keyword new so you can't have a memory leak. –  andre Feb 28 '13 at 22:20
2  
@SoulDZIN unless your working with tight constraints like an embedded system. Throwing an exception is the correct thing to do in this situation. –  andre Feb 28 '13 at 22:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
ExceptionHandler handler;
if (!foo(&handler)) {
    //...
}

defines an object with automatic storage duration, address of which is passed into the foo function. By the way, if you know you will always pass an argument to the function, then pass it by reference instead of pointer.

bool foo(ExceptionHandler * errHandler = NULL) {
    ExceptionHandler handler("Error in foo", 1);
    *errHandler = handler;
}

also creates another instance of ExceptionHandler with automatic storage duration, so this object is destroyed once the execution goes out of scope. But it's ok, since *errHandler = handler; uses a default assignment operator, that copies the values of handler's data members into the object that errHandler points to, so there's no memory leak in this case.

"Is this a good way of handling errors?"

No. This is not a proper way of handling errors. Use exceptions instead. Just make sure you don't end up abusing exceptions as an another way of passing the data through your program. So I recommend you to also have a look at: Why should exceptions be used conservatively?

Other relevant questions:
Is there a general consensus in the C++ community on when exceptions should be used?
"We do not use C++ exceptions" — What's the alternative? Let it crash?


Once you decide to use exceptions, make sure you throw by value and catch by reference:

if (...)
    throw MyException(...);

and somewhere:

try {
    ...
} catch (MyException& e) {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, is the reason for this so that the exception references the one thrown so that its not copied? –  SoulDZIN Mar 1 '13 at 15:39
    
@SoulDZIN: Yes, but the main reason behind is to avoid slicing. If you throw exception of type MySpecialException1 but you would catch its base class by value: catch (MyException e), then custom data members specific for MySpecialException1 class will be lost. –  LihO Mar 1 '13 at 15:45
    
Interesting, I will keep note of this and change my edit, thanks! –  SoulDZIN Mar 1 '13 at 15:48

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