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I'm trying to create a submenu animation to have it drop in from behind it's parent menu like it's on a hinge. I want it to go a little past its final resting position, then come back. From my understanding of the cubic-bezier() functional notation, this should be possible. I'm not sure if it's a bug or just me misunderstanding but I can't seem to get it to work. I removed all of the vendor prefixes (they are in the demo) but here's the code I'm using:

HTML

<ul class="nav">
    <li>
        <a href="index.html">Home</a>
    </li>
    <li>
        <a href="about.html">About</a>
        <ul>
            <li>
                <a href="about.html#company">Company</a>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="about.html#team">Team</a>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </li>
    <li>
     <a href="contact.html">Contact</a>
    </li>
</ul>

CSS

ul {
    background-color:#99f;
    border-radius:10px;
    list-style:none;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}

ul:after {
    clear:both;
    content:'';
    display:block;
    height:0;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    width:100%;
}

.nav > li {
    display:block;
    float:left;
    perspective:600px;
    perspective-origin:100% 100%;
    transition:background-color .2s .4s;
}

.nav li a {
    color:#fff;
    display:block;
    padding:20px;
    text-decoration:none;
}

.nav li ul {
    background-color:#bbf;
    border-radius:0 0 10px 10px;
    position:absolute;
    transform:rotateX(-90deg);
    transform-origin:0 0 0;
    transition:transform .4s cubic-bezier(0.175, 0.885, 0.32, 1.275);
}

.nav li:hover {
    background-color:#bbf;
    -webkit-transition-delay:0;
}

.nav li:hover ul {
    transform:rotateX(0);
    transition-delay:.2s;
}

.nav li li {
    white-space:nowrap;
}

Live Demo

So based on the information from this MDN article, cubic-bezier() can have values greater than 1 on the Y axis, allowing for a bounce effect. In theory, this means the cubic-bezier() I'm using should make the submenu swing from -90deg, down to about 15deg, then back to 0deg.

Unfortunately, I'm not seeing that behavior. I do see that the cubic-bezier() affects the timing of the animation versus using no timing function at all, but it does not provide the bounce effect I expect.

I'm betting it has something to do with going from -90deg to 0deg and past but I'm super lost at this point. I've been unable so far to find any documentation on using cubic-bezier() curves with the rotateX() function to generate this type of effect or even documentation stating whether or not rotateX() supports this kind of rotation or what in the world is going on... help?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The third data in the transition property is a timing function (as you already say). In any way can change what happens in the transition (going to another coordinates, for instance)

I guess that your only option is using keyframes. (not so bad after all)

Of course you won't get a bezier interpolation, but I think that specifying 3 or 4 keyframes will make it good enough

CORRECTION

I was wrong.

Yes, bouncing effects can be done with a cubic-bezier.

You can get a cool page about that here

easing transitions demo

I guess that you problem is that not all properties can be "bounced", or more exactly, that not all properties can be extended beyond the 100% limits of the transiton.

Sorry !

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Could you clarify? I'm not sure what you're trying to tell me. I'm aware that I could accomplish the task with an animation, that's not an issue. What I'm trying to figure out is whether or not it's possible to accomplish using cubic-bezier(), or more specifically some documentation about why it doesn't work. –  trezy Mar 1 '13 at 14:58
    
Thanks for the clarification. However according to the linked MDN article, that's not true. The third paragraph on the page states: The output ratio can be greater than 1.0 (or smaller than 0.0). This causes the animation to go farther than the final state, then come back, in a kind of bouncing effect. This is why I anticipated the cubic-bezier function being able to do what I asked. Besically, the abscissas must be between 1 and 0, but the ordinate may be any value between, above, or below 1 and 0. With that logic, the function I posted should work. –  trezy Mar 7 '13 at 21:03

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