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Example below shows two common, modern, approaches for providing event handling in a custom JavaScript object. (I think.) The example is based on the common scenario of loading data in jQuery via AJAX, where a parameter is passed in that also needs to be provided in the eventual completed event that gets published.

CustomClass.prototype.loadData(param1) {

  var thisObj = this;
  $.ajax({
    url : this.reqUrl,
    context: this,

    // There are various ways to do this, including writing the handlers inline
    // or using $.proxy. Shouldn't be important for this question.
    success : function(dataResp, textStatus) {thisObj.onSuccess(dataResp,
                                                                textStatus,
                                                                param1)}
  });
};

// Manage listeners. Storing functions here, but
// could also use objects with predefined functions.
CustomClass.prototype.addListener(callbackFunc) {
  this.listeners.Add(callbackFunc);
}

CustomClass.prototype.onSuccess(dataResp, textStatus, param1) {

  //**OPTION 1**
  // Publish event via callbacks/listeners
  for(var i=0; i<this.listeners; i++)
    this.listeners[i](dataResp, param1);

  //**OPTION 2**
  // Publish event via trigger/on
  $(this).trigger('my-event-name', [dataResp, param1]);

};

Following shows how these two options would look in code:

function handler(dataResp, param1) {
  // do work, param1 == 'whatever'
}

c1 = new CustomClass();
c1.addListener(handler);
c1.loadData('whatever');

c2 = new CustomClass();
$(c2).on('my-event-name', handler);
c2.loadData('whatever');

The result is the same with either option above. Using jquery's on/trigger support removes need to have code for managing listeners, but:

  • Is one approach definitely better than the other?
  • Are there any significant tradeoffs when using on/trigger, such as performance?

There are many questions/answers on SO regarding the benefits of using event listener style programming with DOM elements. And there are many questions/answers regarding various ways to provide event handling in non DOM objects. However, I couldn't find anything definitive regarding preferred approach for non DOM objects and the potential tradeoffs, especially in non-trivial use cases such as example above.

EDIT ...of course after posting, I see that this question/answer comes (very) close. However, it does not indicate if there are any other ramifications besides adding additional properties to the custom object. Also, I believe my question provides a clearer use case.

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I personally would stay away from using jQuery() methods on non-dom node objects to avoid weird issues later (such as extra properties appearing on the original object), however many of the methods will work without problems. Have you looked into the $.Callbacks method? – Kevin B Feb 28 '13 at 22:51
    
Performance-wise, executing a method directly will always be faster than telling something else to execute it for you. Usually the reason for using something to trigger it for you is to make maintaining it easier at the cost of performance. – Kevin B Feb 28 '13 at 22:53
    
I have seen $.Callbacks, and should've mentioned. It would remove the need to write the explicit listener management code. It is seeming like the only way to understand why to choose one method over another though (at least in jQuery world) is to pull down and read through the jQuery source. – kaliatech Feb 28 '13 at 22:57
    
You could also look at it this way. .on internally uses $.Callbacks, so does jQuery's deferred object. Deferred objects are another option that you could use if your "events" can only happen once, it's easy to turn any old object into a valid deferred object. – Kevin B Feb 28 '13 at 22:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In answer to my own question:

It is better to use callbacks when writing custom objects that are not generating or consuming events as part of DOM interaction. The use of jQuery's on/trigger event handling inherits a lot of extra code paths because it hooks in to jQuery's larger event handling subsystem. Some of the logic is for handling browser differences. Additional code is used because it reuses and/or replicates the functionality of the event handling found in web browsers, but in a cross browser context.

In contrast, using custom callback handling is trivial. Jquery also provides the $.Callbacks function which can save some coding and optionally includes more advanced callback functionality.

A more complete answer to this question would provide timing analysis of the various approaches. However, the source of jquery v1.9.1 alone provides strong anecdotal evidence:

jQuery's trigger method:

trigger: function( event, data, elem, onlyHandlers ) {
    var handle, ontype, cur,
        bubbleType, special, tmp, i,
        eventPath = [ elem || document ],
        type = core_hasOwn.call( event, "type" ) ? event.type : event,
        namespaces = core_hasOwn.call( event, "namespace" ) ? event.namespace.split(".") : [];

    cur = tmp = elem = elem || document;

    // Don't do events on text and comment nodes
    if ( elem.nodeType === 3 || elem.nodeType === 8 ) {
        return;
    }

    // focus/blur morphs to focusin/out; ensure we're not firing them right now
    if ( rfocusMorph.test( type + jQuery.event.triggered ) ) {
        return;
    }

    if ( type.indexOf(".") >= 0 ) {
        // Namespaced trigger; create a regexp to match event type in handle()
        namespaces = type.split(".");
        type = namespaces.shift();
        namespaces.sort();
    }
    ontype = type.indexOf(":") < 0 && "on" + type;

    // Caller can pass in a jQuery.Event object, Object, or just an event type string
    event = event[ jQuery.expando ] ?
        event :
        new jQuery.Event( type, typeof event === "object" && event );

    event.isTrigger = true;
    event.namespace = namespaces.join(".");
    event.namespace_re = event.namespace ?
        new RegExp( "(^|\\.)" + namespaces.join("\\.(?:.*\\.|)") + "(\\.|$)" ) :
        null;

    // Clean up the event in case it is being reused
    event.result = undefined;
    if ( !event.target ) {
        event.target = elem;
    }

    // Clone any incoming data and prepend the event, creating the handler arg list
    data = data == null ?
        [ event ] :
        jQuery.makeArray( data, [ event ] );

    // Allow special events to draw outside the lines
    special = jQuery.event.special[ type ] || {};
    if ( !onlyHandlers && special.trigger && special.trigger.apply( elem, data ) === false ) {
        return;
    }

    // Determine event propagation path in advance, per W3C events spec (#9951)
    // Bubble up to document, then to window; watch for a global ownerDocument var (#9724)
    if ( !onlyHandlers && !special.noBubble && !jQuery.isWindow( elem ) ) {

        bubbleType = special.delegateType || type;
        if ( !rfocusMorph.test( bubbleType + type ) ) {
            cur = cur.parentNode;
        }
        for ( ; cur; cur = cur.parentNode ) {
            eventPath.push( cur );
            tmp = cur;
        }

        // Only add window if we got to document (e.g., not plain obj or detached DOM)
        if ( tmp === (elem.ownerDocument || document) ) {
            eventPath.push( tmp.defaultView || tmp.parentWindow || window );
        }
    }

    // Fire handlers on the event path
    i = 0;
    while ( (cur = eventPath[i++]) && !event.isPropagationStopped() ) {

        event.type = i > 1 ?
            bubbleType :
            special.bindType || type;

        // jQuery handler
        handle = ( jQuery._data( cur, "events" ) || {} )[ event.type ] && jQuery._data( cur, "handle" );
        if ( handle ) {
            handle.apply( cur, data );
        }

        // Native handler
        handle = ontype && cur[ ontype ];
        if ( handle && jQuery.acceptData( cur ) && handle.apply && handle.apply( cur, data ) === false ) {
            event.preventDefault();
        }
    }
    event.type = type;

    // If nobody prevented the default action, do it now
    if ( !onlyHandlers && !event.isDefaultPrevented() ) {

        if ( (!special._default || special._default.apply( elem.ownerDocument, data ) === false) &&
            !(type === "click" && jQuery.nodeName( elem, "a" )) && jQuery.acceptData( elem ) ) {

            // Call a native DOM method on the target with the same name name as the event.
            // Can't use an .isFunction() check here because IE6/7 fails that test.
            // Don't do default actions on window, that's where global variables be (#6170)
            if ( ontype && elem[ type ] && !jQuery.isWindow( elem ) ) {

                // Don't re-trigger an onFOO event when we call its FOO() method
                tmp = elem[ ontype ];

                if ( tmp ) {
                    elem[ ontype ] = null;
                }

                // Prevent re-triggering of the same event, since we already bubbled it above
                jQuery.event.triggered = type;
                try {
                    elem[ type ]();
                } catch ( e ) {
                    // IE<9 dies on focus/blur to hidden element (#1486,#12518)
                    // only reproducible on winXP IE8 native, not IE9 in IE8 mode
                }
                jQuery.event.triggered = undefined;

                if ( tmp ) {
                    elem[ ontype ] = tmp;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return event.result;
}

For additional info see the comments to this question by @kevin-b, as well as this older question/answer.

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